What Pool Cleaners Work Best With Fibreglass Pools?

When it comes to maintaining the pristine condition of your fibreglass pool, choosing the right pool cleaner is crucial. The best pool cleaners for fibreglass pools are those specifically designed to handle the unique composition of fibreglass without causing damage. In this section, we will discuss some of the top pool cleaners that work best with fibreglass pools.

what-pool-cleaners-work-best-banner

Robotic Pool Cleaners

Robotic pool cleaners have gained immense popularity as the preferred choice for fibreglass pools, and it’s easy to see why. These highly advanced cleaning machines go beyond just scrubbing away dirt and algae; they also efficiently filter and circulate the water, resulting in improved overall water quality that you can truly feel. Renowned brands like Dolphin and Polaris have established their reputation in the market with their top-of-the-line robotic pool cleaners, boasting advanced features such as smart navigation systems and programmable cleaning cycles. With their exceptional performance and cutting-edge technology, these robotic pool cleaners offer an unparalleled level of convenience and effectiveness in maintaining a crystal-clear pool for you to enjoy.

Suction Side Pool Cleaners

Suction side pool cleaners are a great choice for fibreglass pools. These cleaners utilise a suction effect to draw in dirt and debris as they move along the bottom of the pool. One notable example of a suction side cleaner that works exceptionally well on fibreglass surfaces is the Baracuda G3. Another excellent option is the Hayward Poolvergnuegen. Both of these cleaners are specifically designed to provide effective cleaning while being gentle on fibreglass materials.

Pressure Side Pool Cleaners

Pressure side pool cleaners, like the Polaris Vac-Sweep 360, are a great option to consider for keeping your pool clean and debris-free. These cleaners utilise the pressure generated by the pool’s return jet to effortlessly navigate and collect debris along their path. With their superior ability to pick up larger debris such as leaves and twigs, pressure side cleaners offer an effective and efficient cleaning solution for your pool.

what-pool-cleaners-work-best-blogimage2

Manual Pool Cleaning Tools

Finally, when it comes to fibreglass pools, using manual pool cleaning tools can be highly effective. Pool brushes with gentle nylon bristles are specifically designed to clean fibreglass surfaces without causing any scratches. Additionally, a vacuum head that is specifically designed for fibreglass pools can be an incredibly helpful tool for spot cleaning those hard-to-reach areas. Regularly using these manual cleaning tools in conjunction with other pool cleaners can help to maintain a clean and well-maintained fibreglass pool.

Other Pool Cleaners

There are also other pool cleaning types worthy of mention, such as automatic pool cleaners and handheld pool vacuums. Automatic pool cleaners, like the Kreepy Krauly, offer convenience as they can be set to clean without supervision, making them a practical choice for those with busy schedules. Handheld pool vacuums, on the other hand, provide an excellent option for spot cleaning and quick clean-ups. They are portable, easy to use, and particularly useful for small pools, hot tubs, or spa areas. Regardless of the type chosen, it’s important to ensure that the pool cleaner is compatible with fibreglass surfaces to avoid potential damage.

The Importance of Pool Maintenance

Maintaining your fibreglass pool is of paramount importance not only to its aesthetics but also to its functionality and longevity. A well-kept pool ensures that the water remains clean and safe for use, reducing the risk of waterborne diseases. It also preserves the integrity of the fibreglass surface, preventing damage and costly repairs down the line. Regular maintenance of the fibreglass pool can also increase its value and enhance its visual appeal, making it a stunning centrepiece for your home.

When it comes to maintaining your fibreglass pool, here are some tips you can consider:

what-pool-cleaners-work-best-blogimage1

Regular Cleaning

As previously discussed, using the appropriate type of pool cleaner, such as a robotic or suction cleaner, can effectively maintain the cleanliness and clarity of your pool. It is advisable to establish a consistent cleaning schedule, ensuring that your pool remains free from the accumulation of dirt, debris, and unwanted algae. By adhering to this routine, you can enjoy a sparkling and inviting pool throughout the swimming season.

Balanced Water Chemistry

This is a crucial aspect of pool maintenance. It is important to regularly monitor and adjust the pH and chlorine levels in your pool to ensure a safe and enjoyable swimming environment. Balancing the water chemistry not only helps prevent damage to the fibreglass surface, but also promotes optimal water clarity, prevents algae growth, and ensures the effectiveness of sanitizers.

Filter Maintenance

The pool filter plays a crucial role in keeping the water clean. Regularly clean and, if necessary, replace the pool filter to ensure it functions efficiently. A clogged or malfunctioning filter can result in dirty and cloudy pool water, making it more challenging to maintain the clarity of your pool.

Inspection and Repair

Regularly inspecting your fibreglass pool for any cracks, chips, or other damages can help prevent further deterioration. Any minor repairs needed may be done yourself but anything should be done promptly by a professional to avoid potential costly issues down the line

Professional Check-ups

While routine maintenance can be performed by the pool owner, it’s advisable to have your pool professionally inspected at least once a year. This helps detect any potential issues that may not be visible to the untrained eye.

Remember, a well-maintained fibreglass pool will provide you with years of enjoyment, so it is well worth the time and effort to keep it in top condition. With the right pool cleaner and maintenance routine, you can ensure that your fibreglass pool remains a source of relaxation and fun for many years to come.

To Conclude

In conclusion, the maintenance of fibreglass pools is a critical task that requires the right selection of pool cleaners. Robotic pool cleaners, suction side cleaners, pressure side cleaners, manual tools, automatic pool cleaners, and handheld vacuums all come with unique features and benefits that make them suitable for different needs and circumstances. It’s essential to choose a cleaner compatible with fibreglass to prevent potential damage. Remember, regular cleaning and proper maintenance not only keep your pool visually appealing but also ensure a healthy swimming environment and extend the longevity of your pool system. By investing in a suitable pool cleaner and dedicating time for regular maintenance, you can truly enjoy the full benefits of your fibreglass pool.

What Pool Cleaners Work Best With Fibreglass Pools?

When it comes to maintaining the pristine condition of your fibreglass pool, choosing the right pool cleaner is crucial. The best pool cleaners for fibreglass pools are those specifically designed to handle the unique composition of fibreglass without causing damage. In this section, we will discuss some of the top pool cleaners that work best with fibreglass pools.

what-pool-cleaners-work-best-banner-m

Robotic Pool Cleaners

Robotic pool cleaners have gained immense popularity as the preferred choice for fibreglass pools, and it’s easy to see why. These highly advanced cleaning machines go beyond just scrubbing away dirt and algae; they also efficiently filter and circulate the water, resulting in improved overall water quality that you can truly feel. Renowned brands like Dolphin and Polaris have established their reputation in the market with their top-of-the-line robotic pool cleaners, boasting advanced features such as smart navigation systems and programmable cleaning cycles. With their exceptional performance and cutting-edge technology, these robotic pool cleaners offer an unparalleled level of convenience and effectiveness in maintaining a crystal-clear pool for you to enjoy.

Suction Side Pool Cleaners

Suction side pool cleaners are a great choice for fibreglass pools. These cleaners utilise a suction effect to draw in dirt and debris as they move along the bottom of the pool. One notable example of a suction side cleaner that works exceptionally well on fibreglass surfaces is the Baracuda G3. Another excellent option is the Hayward Poolvergnuegen. Both of these cleaners are specifically designed to provide effective cleaning while being gentle on fibreglass materials.

Pressure Side Pool Cleaners

Pressure side pool cleaners, like the Polaris Vac-Sweep 360, are a great option to consider for keeping your pool clean and debris-free. These cleaners utilise the pressure generated by the pool’s return jet to effortlessly navigate and collect debris along their path. With their superior ability to pick up larger debris such as leaves and twigs, pressure side cleaners offer an effective and efficient cleaning solution for your pool.

what-pool-cleaners-work-best-blogimage2-m

Manual Pool Cleaning Tools

Finally, when it comes to fibreglass pools, using manual pool cleaning tools can be highly effective. Pool brushes with gentle nylon bristles are specifically designed to clean fibreglass surfaces without causing any scratches. Additionally, a vacuum head that is specifically designed for fibreglass pools can be an incredibly helpful tool for spot cleaning those hard-to-reach areas. Regularly using these manual cleaning tools in conjunction with other pool cleaners can help to maintain a clean and well-maintained fibreglass pool.

Other Pool Cleaners

There are also other pool cleaning types worthy of mention, such as automatic pool cleaners and handheld pool vacuums. Automatic pool cleaners, like the Kreepy Krauly, offer convenience as they can be set to clean without supervision, making them a practical choice for those with busy schedules. Handheld pool vacuums, on the other hand, provide an excellent option for spot cleaning and quick clean-ups. They are portable, easy to use, and particularly useful for small pools, hot tubs, or spa areas. Regardless of the type chosen, it’s important to ensure that the pool cleaner is compatible with fibreglass surfaces to avoid potential damage.

The Importance of Pool Maintenance

Maintaining your fibreglass pool is of paramount importance not only to its aesthetics but also to its functionality and longevity. A well-kept pool ensures that the water remains clean and safe for use, reducing the risk of waterborne diseases. It also preserves the integrity of the fibreglass surface, preventing damage and costly repairs down the line. Regular maintenance of the fibreglass pool can also increase its value and enhance its visual appeal, making it a stunning centrepiece for your home.

When it comes to maintaining your fibreglass pool, here are some tips you can consider:

what-pool-cleaners-work-best-blogimage1-m

Regular Cleaning

As previously discussed, using the appropriate type of pool cleaner, such as a robotic or suction cleaner, can effectively maintain the cleanliness and clarity of your pool. It is advisable to establish a consistent cleaning schedule, ensuring that your pool remains free from the accumulation of dirt, debris, and unwanted algae. By adhering to this routine, you can enjoy a sparkling and inviting pool throughout the swimming season.

Balanced Water Chemistry

This is a crucial aspect of pool maintenance. It is important to regularly monitor and adjust the pH and chlorine levels in your pool to ensure a safe and enjoyable swimming environment. Balancing the water chemistry not only helps prevent damage to the fibreglass surface, but also promotes optimal water clarity, prevents algae growth, and ensures the effectiveness of sanitizers.

Filter Maintenance

The pool filter plays a crucial role in keeping the water clean. Regularly clean and, if necessary, replace the pool filter to ensure it functions efficiently. A clogged or malfunctioning filter can result in dirty and cloudy pool water, making it more challenging to maintain the clarity of your pool.

Inspection and Repair

Regularly inspecting your fibreglass pool for any cracks, chips, or other damages can help prevent further deterioration. Any minor repairs needed may be done yourself but anything should be done promptly by a professional to avoid potential costly issues down the line

Professional Check-ups

While routine maintenance can be performed by the pool owner, it’s advisable to have your pool professionally inspected at least once a year. This helps detect any potential issues that may not be visible to the untrained eye.

Remember, a well-maintained fibreglass pool will provide you with years of enjoyment, so it is well worth the time and effort to keep it in top condition. With the right pool cleaner and maintenance routine, you can ensure that your fibreglass pool remains a source of relaxation and fun for many years to come.

To Conclude

In conclusion, the maintenance of fibreglass pools is a critical task that requires the right selection of pool cleaners. Robotic pool cleaners, suction side cleaners, pressure side cleaners, manual tools, automatic pool cleaners, and handheld vacuums all come with unique features and benefits that make them suitable for different needs and circumstances. It’s essential to choose a cleaner compatible with fibreglass to prevent potential damage. Remember, regular cleaning and proper maintenance not only keep your pool visually appealing but also ensure a healthy swimming environment and extend the longevity of your pool system. By investing in a suitable pool cleaner and dedicating time for regular maintenance, you can truly enjoy the full benefits of your fibreglass pool.

A Handy Pool Maintenance Guide

Owning a swimming pool is a fantastic way to fully embrace and enjoy the summer months, providing a refreshing hangout right in your own backyard. However, it's important to note that being a pool owner doesn't mean you can just sit back, relax and enjoy. There are some general maintenance practices to follow and by following these, you can ensure that your pool remains in top-notch condition, guaranteeing a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone. Here is what you need to know about maintaining your pool:

Is It Necessary?

Absolutely, pool maintenance is essential. Without proper care and attention, your swimming pool can quickly become a breeding ground for bacteria and algae, which can pose serious health risks to swimmers. Moreover, neglecting maintenance can lead to damages in the pool infrastructure, resulting in costly repairs. Regular maintenance ensures that the water is clean, safe, and inviting, making every swim a delightful experience. Therefore, pool maintenance isn’t just necessary, it’s a responsibility that every pool owner must embrace.

Fibreglass Pools Maintenance

Fibreglass pools are renowned for their durability and ease of maintenance. Nevertheless, there are certain practices you should adopt to keep your fibreglass pool in an excellent state.

Regular maintenance is key to keeping your fibreglass pool clean and in great condition. Check water chemistry weekly to balance pH levels, chlorine, calcium hardness, and total alkalinity. Brush the walls and floor to prevent algae growth. Be gentle with cleaning tools and chemicals to protect the gel coat finish. Use a pool cover to reduce cleaning and prolong the pool’s lifespan. Enjoy a sparkling clean pool and a better swimming experience!

Testing and Balancing Water Chemistry

Testing and maintaining the right water chemistry is essential in pool maintenance. The primary parameters to monitor include pH level, chlorine, calcium hardness, and total alkalinity.

The pH level, which measures the water’s acidity or alkalinity, should ideally be between 7.4 and 7.6. A high pH level leads to cloudy water and scaling, while a low pH level can cause skin irritation and damage the pool equipment.

Chlorine is used to sanitise the pool water by killing bacteria and other harmful organisms. Maintaining a proper chlorine level (1.0-3.0 ppm) is crucial to ensure a safe swimming environment.

Calcium hardness refers to the amount of dissolved calcium in the pool water. If the calcium level is too high, it can result in scaling on the pool surface and equipment. On the other hand, a low calcium level can lead to pool surface damage. The ideal range is between 200-400 ppm.

Total Alkalinity measures the water’s ability to neutralise acids and should be maintained between 80-120 ppm. A balanced total alkalinity helps prevent sudden shifts in pH levels.

Testing your pool water on a weekly basis is recommended. You can use test strips or a digital test kit for accuracy. By monitoring and maintaining the right water chemistry, you can avoid common pool problems, prolong the lifespan of your pool, and provide a safe and enjoyable swimming experience.

Pool Cleaning Basics

Now that the scientific stuff is out of the way, let’s have a look at the basics!

A clean pool is a happy pool, and to keep it that way, you’ll need to incorporate a regular cleaning routine into your schedule. The schedule will vary depending on the time of year and how frequently the pool is being used.

Start with skimming the pool’s surface with a leaf net or pool skimmer to remove any floating debris. This should be done as often as possible, ideally daily, to prevent debris from sinking to the bottom, making it harder to remove.

Next up is brushing. Using a pool brush, scrub the sides, ladder, and corners of the pool. This should be done once a week to prevent the build-up of algae.

At least once a week, use a pool vacuum to clean the pool floor and walls. Manual or automatic, the choice of vacuum depends on your preference and budget. This helps to remove any debris that has sunk to the bottom and can’t be removed by skimming.

The pool filter also plays a crucial role in keeping the pool clean. Depending on the type of filter, it will need to be cleaned or replaced regularly. As a rule of thumb, the filter should be cleaned when the water pressure reaches 8 to 10 psi above the starting pressure.

Remember, by creating a regular cleaning schedule and keeping on top of these jobs you will prevent any major issues or messes from occurring and you can ensure that your pool is ready for summertime fun all season long!

Pool Equipment Maintenance

Keeping your pool equipment in top form is just as crucial as maintaining the pool’s water chemistry and cleanliness. This equipment includes the pool pump, filter, heater, and pool cleaning tools, among others.

The pool pump is the heart of your pool’s circulation system. To ensure it runs smoothly, clear out the pump basket of debris every week, and check for any signs of wear and tear. If you find any, carry out necessary repairs or replacements to prevent the pump from failing.

Next, we have the pool filter, which is essential for keeping your pool water clean. The maintenance frequency depends on the type of the filter. Sand filters require backwashing every few weeks, whereas cartridge filters need to be disassembled and cleaned every month. For DE filters, they need backwashing and addition of new DE powder regularly.

Don’t neglect the pool heater. Gas heaters typically require professional servicing once a year to maintain efficiency. If your pool uses an electric heater, it usually requires less maintenance but do keep an eye for calcium scales which can limit its effectiveness.

Lastly, take good care of your pool cleaning tools like skimmers, brushes, and vacuums. Rinse them thoroughly after each use and store them in a cool, dry place. Regularly check for signs of wear and replace them as necessary.

To Conclude

Remember, well-maintained equipment not only prolongs its lifespan but also contributes to the overall health and safety of your pool and the people using it. If you are ever in doubt just give us a call, we are happy to help. A little time and effort spent on equipment maintenance can prevent major problems down the line, ensuring your pool remains a source of joy and relaxation.

A Handy Pool Maintenance Guide

Owning a swimming pool is a fantastic way to fully embrace and enjoy the summer months, providing a refreshing hangout right in your own backyard. However, it's important to note that being a pool owner doesn't mean you can just sit back, relax and enjoy. There are some general maintenance practices to follow and by following these, you can ensure that your pool remains in top-notch condition, guaranteeing a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone. Here is what you need to know about maintaining your pool:

A-handy-pool-maintenance-guide

Is It Necessary?

Absolutely, pool maintenance is essential. Without proper care and attention, your swimming pool can quickly become a breeding ground for bacteria and algae, which can pose serious health risks to swimmers. Moreover, neglecting maintenance can lead to damages in the pool infrastructure, resulting in costly repairs. Regular maintenance ensures that the water is clean, safe, and inviting, making every swim a delightful experience. Therefore, pool maintenance isn’t just necessary, it’s a responsibility that every pool owner must embrace.

Fibreglass Pools Maintenance

Fibreglass pools are renowned for their durability and ease of maintenance. Nevertheless, there are certain practices you should adopt to keep your fibreglass pool in an excellent state.

Regular maintenance is key to keeping your fibreglass pool clean and in great condition. Check water chemistry weekly to balance pH levels, chlorine, calcium hardness, and total alkalinity. Brush the walls and floor to prevent algae growth. Be gentle with cleaning tools and chemicals to protect the gel coat finish. Use a pool cover to reduce cleaning and prolong the pool’s lifespan. Enjoy a sparkling clean pool and a better swimming experience!

a-handy-pool-maintenance-guide-blog

Testing and Balancing Water Chemistry

Testing and maintaining the right water chemistry is essential in pool maintenance. The primary parameters to monitor include pH level, chlorine, calcium hardness, and total alkalinity.

The pH level, which measures the water’s acidity or alkalinity, should ideally be between 7.4 and 7.6. A high pH level leads to cloudy water and scaling, while a low pH level can cause skin irritation and damage the pool equipment.

Chlorine is used to sanitise the pool water by killing bacteria and other harmful organisms. Maintaining a proper chlorine level (1.0-3.0 ppm) is crucial to ensure a safe swimming environment.

Calcium hardness refers to the amount of dissolved calcium in the pool water. If the calcium level is too high, it can result in scaling on the pool surface and equipment. On the other hand, a low calcium level can lead to pool surface damage. The ideal range is between 200-400 ppm.

Total Alkalinity measures the water’s ability to neutralise acids and should be maintained between 80-120 ppm. A balanced total alkalinity helps prevent sudden shifts in pH levels.

Testing your pool water on a weekly basis is recommended. You can use test strips or a digital test kit for accuracy. By monitoring and maintaining the right water chemistry, you can avoid common pool problems, prolong the lifespan of your pool, and provide a safe and enjoyable swimming experience.

Pool Cleaning Basics

Now that the scientific stuff is out of the way, let’s have a look at the basics!

A clean pool is a happy pool, and to keep it that way, you’ll need to incorporate a regular cleaning routine into your schedule. The schedule will vary depending on the time of year and how frequently the pool is being used.

Start with skimming the pool’s surface with a leaf net or pool skimmer to remove any floating debris. This should be done as often as possible, ideally daily, to prevent debris from sinking to the bottom, making it harder to remove.

Next up is brushing. Using a pool brush, scrub the sides, ladder, and corners of the pool. This should be done once a week to prevent the build-up of algae.

At least once a week, use a pool vacuum to clean the pool floor and walls. Manual or automatic, the choice of vacuum depends on your preference and budget. This helps to remove any debris that has sunk to the bottom and can’t be removed by skimming.

The pool filter also plays a crucial role in keeping the pool clean. Depending on the type of filter, it will need to be cleaned or replaced regularly. As a rule of thumb, the filter should be cleaned when the water pressure reaches 8 to 10 psi above the starting pressure.

Remember, by creating a regular cleaning schedule and keeping on top of these jobs you will prevent any major issues or messes from occurring and you can ensure that your pool is ready for summertime fun all season long!

A-handy-pool-maintenance-guide

Pool Equipment Maintenance

Keeping your pool equipment in top form is just as crucial as maintaining the pool’s water chemistry and cleanliness. This equipment includes the pool pump, filter, heater, and pool cleaning tools, among others.

The pool pump is the heart of your pool’s circulation system. To ensure it runs smoothly, clear out the pump basket of debris every week, and check for any signs of wear and tear. If you find any, carry out necessary repairs or replacements to prevent the pump from failing.

Next, we have the pool filter, which is essential for keeping your pool water clean. The maintenance frequency depends on the type of the filter. Sand filters require backwashing every few weeks, whereas cartridge filters need to be disassembled and cleaned every month. For DE filters, they need backwashing and addition of new DE powder regularly.

Don’t neglect the pool heater. Gas heaters typically require professional servicing once a year to maintain efficiency. If your pool uses an electric heater, it usually requires less maintenance but do keep an eye for calcium scales which can limit its effectiveness.

Lastly, take good care of your pool cleaning tools like skimmers, brushes, and vacuums. Rinse them thoroughly after each use and store them in a cool, dry place. Regularly check for signs of wear and replace them as necessary.

To Conclude

Remember, well-maintained equipment not only prolongs its lifespan but also contributes to the overall health and safety of your pool and the people using it. If you are ever in doubt just give us a call, we are happy to help. A little time and effort spent on equipment maintenance can prevent major problems down the line, ensuring your pool remains a source of joy and relaxation.

What To Do If You Put Too Many Chemicals In Your Pool?

When it comes to maintaining a swimming pool, achieving a safe and enjoyable swimming environment entails carefully balancing the water chemistry. However, it's not uncommon for pool owners to inadvertently add excessive chemicals in their pursuit of crystal clear water. If this situation arises, it becomes crucial to take the necessary steps to correct the chemical imbalance promptly.

too-many-chemicals-in-your-pool-banner

The primary chemicals commonly used in pool maintenance include chlorine, algaecides, pH balancers, and more. Should you happen to add an excessive amount of these chemicals, it can lead to various issues. These may include skin, eye, and respiratory irritations for swimmers, potential damage to the pool equipment, and, of course, less inviting swimming conditions overall. Ensuring the proper chemical balance in your pool is key to creating a safe and enjoyable swimming environment for everyone. So, it's important to be cautious and vigilant when adding chemicals to your pool, maintaining a delicate equilibrium that enhances the overall pool experience.

Here's What You Can Do:

Step One: Identify the Problem

To begin with, it is crucial to identify the specific chemical that is in excess within your pool. For example, if you notice a strong and pungent odour, it is likely an indication of elevated chlorine levels. On the other hand, if your pool water appears cloudy and murky, it could be a result of excessive algaecides. Utilising a comprehensive pool testing kit will greatly assist you in precisely pinpointing and addressing the underlying issue. By taking these necessary steps, you can effectively maintain the optimal balance and clarity of your pool water.

Step Two: Stop Swimming

It is advisable to avoid swimming until the problem is resolved. Excessive chemical levels in the water can potentially lead to various health issues, including skin and eye irritation, as well as respiratory problems. Taking precautionary measures and refraining from swimming will help ensure the well-being and safety of individuals.

too-many-chemicals-in-your-pool-blogimage1

Step Three: Dilute the Chemical Levels

If you find yourself in a situation where you’ve accidentally used too much of a chemical in your pool, don’t worry! The best course of action to resolve this issue is by diluting the chemical. You can achieve this by partially draining the pool and gradually refilling it with fresh water. It’s important to remember to do this gradually, as abrupt changes can potentially disrupt the delicate chemical balance even further. By taking these steps, you’ll effectively address the problem and restore the chemical balance of your pool.

Step Four: Adjust Chemical Levels

Once you have diluted the sample, use your testing kit to verify the chemical levels. If the levels are still too high and out of balance, it is recommended to consider using a chemical reducer. These effective products, readily available at reputable pool supply stores, can assist in restoring your pool’s chemistry back to a safe and optimal range, ensuring a healthy swimming environment for you and your loved ones.

Step Five: Regular Monitoring

After properly adjusting the levels of your pool, it is crucial to maintain the chemistry on a regular basis. This practice will enable you to uphold the perfect balance and prevent any potential issues caused by over-chemicalisation in the future.

While the idea of adding too many chemicals to your pool may seem intimidating, rest assured that with the right information and a little patience, this is a problem that can be effectively resolved. Always bear in mind that when it comes to pool chemicals, less is often more. It is important to add chemicals gradually, testing the water after each addition to ensure optimal results.

too-many-chemicals-in-your-pool-blogimage2

What If I Have A Fibreglass Pool?

Fibreglass pools, like any other type, also require careful chemical maintenance. However, they come with their particularities.

To start with, get a comprehensive pool testing kit suitable for fibreglass pools. Use this to measure the levels of the key chemicals – chlorine, pH balancers, algaecides etc. in your pool. These measurements will help you identify any excesses.

If you’ve added too many chemicals, refrain from swimming until you’ve corrected the imbalance. The next step would also involve dilution – partially drain the pool and refill it with fresh water, doing so slowly to prevent further disruption of the chemical balance.

If the chemical levels remain high after dilution, consider using a chemical reducer designed specifically for fibreglass pools. These are available at most pool supply stores.

Remember, the nature of fibreglass may cause it to react differently to chemicals compared to other pool types. So, always ensure to use products that are safe for fibreglass pools. Regular monitoring and adjustment of the chemical levels is crucial to maintaining a safe and enjoyable swimming environment.

Finally, always proceed with care when adding chemicals to your fibreglass pool. Add gradually, monitor the change, and remember that when it comes to pool chemicals, less is often more.

In the event that you encounter severe over-chemicalisation and your DIY methods do not seem to be effective, it is advisable to seek professional assistance. Pool maintenance professionals possess the expertise, knowledge, and specialised tools necessary to safely and efficiently restore your pool to its ideal condition. By entrusting the task to experts, you can have peace of mind knowing that the safety and comfort of all pool users are guaranteed.

To Sum Up

Maintaining a well-balanced pool is an ongoing process that requires regular attention, adjustment, and continuous monitoring. By comprehending the role of each chemical and understanding the impact of their levels in your pool, you can ensure a safe, clean, and inviting swimming experience for everyone. Remember, a little extra care and attention can go a long way in maintaining the beauty, functionality, and longevity of your pool.

If you are currently in search of a high-quality, durable fibreglass pool, look no further than Newcastle Swimming Pools. Our company, based in Heatherbrae, Newcastle, specialises in providing exceptional fibreglass pools that are designed to withstand the test of time. We would love to assist you and your family in finding the perfect fibreglass pool that suits your backyard and meets your specific requirements.

What To Do If You Put Too Many Chemicals In Your Pool?

When it comes to maintaining a swimming pool, achieving a safe and enjoyable swimming environment entails carefully balancing the water chemistry. However, it's not uncommon for pool owners to inadvertently add excessive chemicals in their pursuit of crystal clear water. If this situation arises, it becomes crucial to take the necessary steps to correct the chemical imbalance promptly.

too-many-chemicals-in-your-pool-banner-m

The primary chemicals commonly used in pool maintenance include chlorine, algaecides, pH balancers, and more. Should you happen to add an excessive amount of these chemicals, it can lead to various issues. These may include skin, eye, and respiratory irritations for swimmers, potential damage to the pool equipment, and, of course, less inviting swimming conditions overall. Ensuring the proper chemical balance in your pool is key to creating a safe and enjoyable swimming environment for everyone. So, it's important to be cautious and vigilant when adding chemicals to your pool, maintaining a delicate equilibrium that enhances the overall pool experience.

Here's What You Can Do:

Step One: Identify the Problem

To begin with, it is crucial to identify the specific chemical that is in excess within your pool. For example, if you notice a strong and pungent odour, it is likely an indication of elevated chlorine levels. On the other hand, if your pool water appears cloudy and murky, it could be a result of excessive algaecides. Utilising a comprehensive pool testing kit will greatly assist you in precisely pinpointing and addressing the underlying issue. By taking these necessary steps, you can effectively maintain the optimal balance and clarity of your pool water.

Step Two: Stop Swimming

It is advisable to avoid swimming until the problem is resolved. Excessive chemical levels in the water can potentially lead to various health issues, including skin and eye irritation, as well as respiratory problems. Taking precautionary measures and refraining from swimming will help ensure the well-being and safety of individuals.

too-many-chemicals-in-your-pool-blogimage1-m

Step Three: Dilute the Chemical Levels

If you find yourself in a situation where you’ve accidentally used too much of a chemical in your pool, don’t worry! The best course of action to resolve this issue is by diluting the chemical. You can achieve this by partially draining the pool and gradually refilling it with fresh water. It’s important to remember to do this gradually, as abrupt changes can potentially disrupt the delicate chemical balance even further. By taking these steps, you’ll effectively address the problem and restore the chemical balance of your pool.

Step Four: Adjust Chemical Levels

Once you have diluted the sample, use your testing kit to verify the chemical levels. If the levels are still too high and out of balance, it is recommended to consider using a chemical reducer. These effective products, readily available at reputable pool supply stores, can assist in restoring your pool’s chemistry back to a safe and optimal range, ensuring a healthy swimming environment for you and your loved ones.

Step Five: Regular Monitoring

After properly adjusting the levels of your pool, it is crucial to maintain the chemistry on a regular basis. This practice will enable you to uphold the perfect balance and prevent any potential issues caused by over-chemicalisation in the future.

While the idea of adding too many chemicals to your pool may seem intimidating, rest assured that with the right information and a little patience, this is a problem that can be effectively resolved. Always bear in mind that when it comes to pool chemicals, less is often more. It is important to add chemicals gradually, testing the water after each addition to ensure optimal results.

too-many-chemicals-in-your-pool-blogimage2-m

What If I Have A Fibreglass Pool?

Fibreglass pools, like any other type, also require careful chemical maintenance. However, they come with their particularities.

To start with, get a comprehensive pool testing kit suitable for fibreglass pools. Use this to measure the levels of the key chemicals – chlorine, pH balancers, algaecides etc. in your pool. These measurements will help you identify any excesses.

If you’ve added too many chemicals, refrain from swimming until you’ve corrected the imbalance. The next step would also involve dilution – partially drain the pool and refill it with fresh water, doing so slowly to prevent further disruption of the chemical balance.

If the chemical levels remain high after dilution, consider using a chemical reducer designed specifically for fibreglass pools. These are available at most pool supply stores.

Remember, the nature of fibreglass may cause it to react differently to chemicals compared to other pool types. So, always ensure to use products that are safe for fibreglass pools. Regular monitoring and adjustment of the chemical levels is crucial to maintaining a safe and enjoyable swimming environment.

Finally, always proceed with care when adding chemicals to your fibreglass pool. Add gradually, monitor the change, and remember that when it comes to pool chemicals, less is often more.

In the event that you encounter severe over-chemicalisation and your DIY methods do not seem to be effective, it is advisable to seek professional assistance. Pool maintenance professionals possess the expertise, knowledge, and specialised tools necessary to safely and efficiently restore your pool to its ideal condition. By entrusting the task to experts, you can have peace of mind knowing that the safety and comfort of all pool users are guaranteed.

To Sum Up

Maintaining a well-balanced pool is an ongoing process that requires regular attention, adjustment, and continuous monitoring. By comprehending the role of each chemical and understanding the impact of their levels in your pool, you can ensure a safe, clean, and inviting swimming experience for everyone. Remember, a little extra care and attention can go a long way in maintaining the beauty, functionality, and longevity of your pool.

If you are currently in search of a high-quality, durable fibreglass pool, look no further than Newcastle Swimming Pools. Our company, based in Heatherbrae, Newcastle, specialises in providing exceptional fibreglass pools that are designed to withstand the test of time. We would love to assist you and your family in finding the perfect fibreglass pool that suits your backyard and meets your specific requirements.

Can Fibreglass Pools Be Saltwater?

Swimming pools may either use a salt water system or a chlorine system, and it’s important for you to understand the benefits and challenges of both chlorine and salt water, so that you can keep your pool in top condition. The older tradition, and what many people are familiar with, is chlorine pools. Salt water pools have now emerged as a popular choice for families, as they can be of benefit for you and your swimming pool. Let us help you understand if a salt water pool is a good option for your fibreglass pool.

can-fibreglass-pools-be-saltwater-banner

How Does Salt Water Sanitise The Pool?

Using a salt chlorine generator, salt is added to the water in the pool and the generator of your pool will directly convert it into chlorine to sanitise the pool. The salt added is at a level high enough to allow the functioning of the generator. A salt chlorinator’s range is usually between 3,000 and 4,000 parts per million. However you don’t have to worry about tasting a lot of salt even if the water from your swimming pool enters your mouth. Swimming pools have salinity levels that are 1/10th the salinity level of the ocean. So it’s not going to be as salty as the sea, in fact, you would only taste as much salt as you would in a teardrop. 

Salt Water Is The Preferred Choice For Fibreglass Pools:

Salt water can help keep your fibreglass pool a lot cleaner, and you may even have a silky feel when you’re in the pool. It is estimated that about 80% of families in Australia utilise a salt water system in their swimming pool. More and more homes are shifting to make use of salt water systems, as they also don’t have to experience the smell or the eye-burning that is so common when a chlorine pool is used. A lot of families actually report that they prefer salt water in their fibreglass pools because they feel cleaner and don’t have the same chlorine smell and taste that other chlorine pools do. A challenge to keep in mind is to look at the area around your fibreglass pool. There may be concrete, equipment, or a timber deck around your pool. These will be subjected to splashing from the pool. Whilst the surfaces will dry over time, the concentration of the salt is high and can corrode objects which have aluminium or metal fittings. You can use fresh water to wash down these surfaces after you use the pool, to prevent this from occurring. Also ensure that the handrails/ guards that you install are compatible with the salt water system you’re using.

Benefits Of Salt Water:

  • Salt water systems can add to the many benefits of the popular fibreglass pools, and make it easier for you and your family to head out for a swim in your backyard. 
  • They’re safer, because the chlorine levels released by the salt chlorine generators are much lower than the concentration in chlorine pools. This means they are safer to use without worrying about the hazards from exposure and contact to such harsh chemicals. Unlike in chlorine, you can keep your eyes open underwater without having to worry about damage or have any pain caused to your eyes. 
  • An unhygienic pool is a major health concern, but with the regular disinfection which occurs with the salt chlorine generators, you won’t have to worry about the safety of your family and friends when they go for a swim. Basically, the process of electrolysis in the saltwater system releases hypochlorous acid, and when salt dissolves in water it helps maintain a clean pool. 
  • Salt water also has the ability to exfoliate, rejuvenate, and even detoxify and cleanse the skin. It increases the ability of the skin to lock in moisture, helping to nourish your skin and giving it a smooth feel, plus you won’t be left smelling like chlorine! 
  • With salt water in your fibreglass pool, you will not have to be concerned about coming out of the pool smelling strongly like chlorine. Salt water pools have very low concentrations of chlorine which aren’t harsh on the body. 
  • People with allergies or sensitive skin can use the pool without the risk of getting itchy or dry skin. You may actually find a lot of relief through the use of salt water in fibreglass pools. 

Did you know that because fibreglass pools have a smooth, non-porous gel-coat, they require less maintenance and cleaning? Fibreglass also doesn’t attract bacteria and algae in the same way that other pools do. The benefit of using a salt water system in a fibreglass pool is that its smooth surface will hardly ever collect bacteria and algae. Vinyl liner pools have metal parts, as well as connections, which will corrode with salt water being used. Salt water can also destroy the interior surfaces of concrete pools, particularly if they have plaster in them. This means that by choosing salt water, you’ll be saving on maintenance costs and time spent cleaning, without having to worry about any risk of corrosion of the pool surface. 

can-fibreglass-pools-be-saltwater-blogimage2

Conclusion

It’s important to check with a professional when making the decision about buying a salt water system for your fibreglass pool. You will need to know everything about the running and maintenance, so you can ensure it functions efficiently. Making sure your salt water fibreglass pool is well maintained and performing regular checks is crucial if you want to prolong the life of your pool and minimise any repair costs. Please contact the team at Newcastle Swimming Pools, as we would be happy to help with any questions you might have around salt water systems for your fibreglass pool.

Can Fibreglass Pools Be Saltwater?

Swimming pools may either use a salt water system or a chlorine system, and it’s important for you to understand the benefits and challenges of both chlorine and salt water, so that you can keep your pool in top condition. The older tradition, and what many people are familiar with, is chlorine pools. Salt water pools have now emerged as a popular choice for families, as they can be of benefit for you and your swimming pool. Let us help you understand if a salt water pool is a good option for your fibreglass pool.

can-fibreglass-pools-be-saltwater-banner-m

How Does Salt Water Sanitise The Pool?

Using a salt chlorine generator, salt is added to the water in the pool and the generator of your pool will directly convert it into chlorine to sanitise the pool. The salt added is at a level high enough to allow the functioning of the generator. A salt chlorinator’s range is usually between 3,000 and 4,000 parts per million. However you don’t have to worry about tasting a lot of salt even if the water from your swimming pool enters your mouth. Swimming pools have salinity levels that are 1/10th the salinity level of the ocean. So it’s not going to be as salty as the sea, in fact, you would only taste as much salt as you would in a teardrop. 

Salt Water Is The Preferred Choice For Fibreglass Pools:

Salt water can help keep your fibreglass pool a lot cleaner, and you may even have a silky feel when you’re in the pool. It is estimated that about 80% of families in Australia utilise a salt water system in their swimming pool. More and more homes are shifting to make use of salt water systems, as they also don’t have to experience the smell or the eye-burning that is so common when a chlorine pool is used. A lot of families actually report that they prefer salt water in their fibreglass pools because they feel cleaner and don’t have the same chlorine smell and taste that other chlorine pools do. A challenge to keep in mind is to look at the area around your fibreglass pool. There may be concrete, equipment, or a timber deck around your pool. These will be subjected to splashing from the pool. Whilst the surfaces will dry over time, the concentration of the salt is high and can corrode objects which have aluminium or metal fittings. You can use fresh water to wash down these surfaces after you use the pool, to prevent this from occurring. Also ensure that the handrails/ guards that you install are compatible with the salt water system you’re using.

can-fibreglass-pools-be-saltwater-blogimage1-m

Benefits Of Salt Water:

  • Salt water systems can add to the many benefits of the popular fibreglass pools, and make it easier for you and your family to head out for a swim in your backyard. 
  • They’re safer, because the chlorine levels released by the salt chlorine generators are much lower than the concentration in chlorine pools. This means they are safer to use without worrying about the hazards from exposure and contact to such harsh chemicals. Unlike in chlorine, you can keep your eyes open underwater without having to worry about damage or have any pain caused to your eyes. 
  • An unhygienic pool is a major health concern, but with the regular disinfection which occurs with the salt chlorine generators, you won’t have to worry about the safety of your family and friends when they go for a swim. Basically, the process of electrolysis in the saltwater system releases hypochlorous acid, and when salt dissolves in water it helps maintain a clean pool. 
  • Salt water also has the ability to exfoliate, rejuvenate, and even detoxify and cleanse the skin. It increases the ability of the skin to lock in moisture, helping to nourish your skin and giving it a smooth feel, plus you won’t be left smelling like chlorine! 
  • With salt water in your fibreglass pool, you will not have to be concerned about coming out of the pool smelling strongly like chlorine. Salt water pools have very low concentrations of chlorine which aren’t harsh on the body. 
  • People with allergies or sensitive skin can use the pool without the risk of getting itchy or dry skin. You may actually find a lot of relief through the use of salt water in fibreglass pools. 

Did you know that because fibreglass pools have a smooth, non-porous gel-coat, they require less maintenance and cleaning? Fibreglass also doesn’t attract bacteria and algae in the same way that other pools do. The benefit of using a salt water system in a fibreglass pool is that its smooth surface will hardly ever collect bacteria and algae. Vinyl liner pools have metal parts, as well as connections, which will corrode with salt water being used. Salt water can also destroy the interior surfaces of concrete pools, particularly if they have plaster in them. This means that by choosing salt water, you’ll be saving on maintenance costs and time spent cleaning, without having to worry about any risk of corrosion of the pool surface. 

can-fibreglass-pools-be-saltwater-blogimage2-m

Conclusion

It’s important to check with a professional when making the decision about buying a salt water system for your fibreglass pool. You will need to know everything about the running and maintenance, so you can ensure it functions efficiently. Making sure your salt water fibreglass pool is well maintained and performing regular checks is crucial if you want to prolong the life of your pool and minimise any repair costs. Please contact the team at Newcastle Swimming Pools, as we would be happy to help with any questions you might have around salt water systems for your fibreglass pool.

A Beginners Guide To Testing Your Pool Water

If you own a pool, it is essential to test the pool water. How can you know what chemical levels are in the pool water if you don't test it? Or are there any potentially dangerous substances in it? Alternatively, how many chemicals must be added to the water to make it clean and safe to swim in? This article is a complete guide to pool water testing.

Why Is It Necessary To Test The Water In Your Pool?

Your pool’s chemicals can keep it clean or turn it potentially deadly. The only way to make sure what those invisible substances are doing in your water is to test it.

You should test your water on a consistent schedule. It’s a good thing, even if it looks to be a pain! The less cleaning and water change you do, the better balanced your water is.

How Often Must You Test The Water In The Pool?

Test at least once a week and more frequently if you use the pool extensively. If you’re new to pool upkeep, you might wish to test 2-3 times each week until you get used to the changes. It’s an excellent way to check your water at least once a week. This not only ensures your pool is safe to swim in, but it protects the gel-coat finish and the integrity of your pool and its equipment.

However, there are circumstances when you should check for balanced levels, such as:

After a pool party – Getting an additional weight on your pool will throw off the balance of your pool. So, after you’ve had visitors or there’s been a lot of pool usage, test your pool and change the balance as needed.

After heavy rain – Rain, as well as other debris, will definitely alter your pool’s chemical levels after a downpour. Vacuum your pool, eliminate all debris, and test it to get your pool’s chemical levels back up to where they should be.

After you add water – Check your pool chemical levels after the water has been cycled and adjust as needed. If the pool water levels have dropped significantly due to evaporation or for any other reason, you need to take them back up.

Before and After algae treatment – If you’re treating algae, you’ll want to monitor your pool’s pH levels. This is before and after the process to ensure that your water shock is as successful as possible. You must also test and calibrate your pool after shocking it, as the pool shock may have changed your chemical levels.

Opening the pool for the summer months – Even if your pool appears to be in excellent condition, it may need to be adjusted after a lengthy period of inactivity. As you prepare to open your swimming for the season, test and alter the composition of the water.

What Are The Typical Chemical Levels In A Pool

The alkalinity, pH, calcium hardness, and chlorine are the essential chemicals to examine in your pool. You may also want to check for metals and stabilisers in some cases. The suggested levels for having a balanced collection are as follows:

Test Range

pH

7.2 – 7.6

Total Alkalinity

120 – 150ppm

Calcium Hardness

150 – 400ppm

Free Bromine

3 – 5ppm

Free Chlorine

1 -3ppm

Metals: Iron & Copper

0ppm

CYA

30 – 50 ppm

There Are Three Main Methods For Pool Testing

There are three primary ways for testing pools that a home pool or spa owner can use to test their pool water properly.

Pool Test Strips – They’re simple to use; dip the strip into the pool water and wait a few moments for the results. It’s confined to whatever reagents are used on the strip, which could be a little off.

Liquid / Reagent Pool Testing Kits – This approach is a little more time consuming, but it is pretty accurate. Reagents for various testing can be obtained as a kit or as individual reagents. Ultimate customisability / you can test for any of the values you feel should be tested. To properly drop in reagents, you’ll need a firm hand.

These could be of two types: First, manual test kits with colour coding that you should interpret. Second, are the digital test kits with a device that scans the data and gives you a numeric number rather than a colour reading.

Professional pool testing – Professional pool testing is the simplest and most accurate method of pool testing, but it is also the most pricey. Collect a water sample and bring it to your local swimming pool store for testing. If things are getting out of line, this is a great alternative, but it shouldn’t go to this position with proper pool upkeep.

How To Combat Contaminants?

If you experience problems with your pool water, you may have to test more regularly. Many of these issues can be created by the quality of the water you put in your pool. Since well water has more elements, your pool water may contain more iron and copper. If the town has hard water, you’re more likely to have high calcium levels.

These pollutants can make maintaining the proper chemical balance in your pool hard, as well as discolour and physically damage pool surfaces. It’s more efficient and cost-effective to keep an eye on them and prevent damage rather than fix it later. Pool water testing is the very first step in that prevention.

How to Safely Add Chemicals To Your Pool Water

1. To ensure that chemicals are being used safely, always read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions to protect your fibreglass pool from damage.

2. Wear the proper protective gear and clothes, such as gloves, shoes, and eyewear.

3. In a well-ventilated place, handle chemicals.

4. Use separate, clear metal or plastic cups to transfer or measure chemicals. Wooden scoops should never be used.

5. Chemicals should indeed be protected against moisture and water, such as a cup of coffee or water. Even placing the wet scoop to the pail may trigger an allergic response.

6. Always dilute the chemicals by adding them to water, not the other way around, unless the container’s label indicates otherwise.

A Beginners Guide To Testing Your Pool Water

If you own a pool, it is essential to test the pool water. How can you know what chemical levels are in the pool water if you don't test it? Or are there any potentially dangerous substances in it? Alternatively, how many chemicals must be added to the water to make it clean and safe to swim in? This article is a complete guide to pool water testing.

Why Is It Necessary To Test The Water In Your Pool?

Your pool’s chemicals can keep it clean or turn it potentially deadly. The only way to make sure what those invisible substances are doing in your water is to test it.

You should test your water on a consistent schedule. It’s a good thing, even if it looks to be a pain! The less cleaning and water change you do, the better balanced your water is.

How Often Must You Test The Water In The Pool?

Test at least once a week and more frequently if you use the pool extensively. If you’re new to pool upkeep, you might wish to test 2-3 times each week until you get used to the changes. It’s an excellent way to check your water at least once a week. This not only ensures your pool is safe to swim in, but it protects the gel-coat finish and the integrity of your pool and its equipment.

However, there are circumstances when you should check for balanced levels, such as:

After a pool party – Getting an additional weight on your pool will throw off the balance of your pool. So, after you’ve had visitors or there’s been a lot of pool usage, test your pool and change the balance as needed.

After heavy rain – Rain, as well as other debris, will definitely alter your pool’s chemical levels after a downpour. Vacuum your pool, eliminate all debris, and test it to get your pool’s chemical levels back up to where they should be.

After you add water – Check your pool chemical levels after the water has been cycled and adjust as needed. If the pool water levels have dropped significantly due to evaporation or for any other reason, you need to take them back up.

Before and After algae treatment – If you’re treating algae, you’ll want to monitor your pool’s pH levels. This is before and after the process to ensure that your water shock is as successful as possible. You must also test and calibrate your pool after shocking it, as the pool shock may have changed your chemical levels.

Opening the pool for the summer months – Even if your pool appears to be in excellent condition, it may need to be adjusted after a lengthy period of inactivity. As you prepare to open your swimming for the season, test and alter the composition of the water.

What Are The Typical Chemical Levels In A Pool

The alkalinity, pH, calcium hardness, and chlorine are the essential chemicals to examine in your pool. You may also want to check for metals and stabilisers in some cases. The suggested levels for having a balanced collection are as follows:

Test Range

pH

7.2 – 7.6

Total Alkalinity

120 – 150ppm

Calcium Hardness

150 – 400ppm

Free Bromine

3 – 5ppm

Free Chlorine

1 -3ppm

Metals: Iron & Copper

0ppm

CYA

30 – 50 ppm

There Are Three Main Methods For Pool Testing

There are three primary ways for testing pools that a home pool or spa owner can use to test their pool water properly.

Pool Test Strips – They’re simple to use; dip the strip into the pool water and wait a few moments for the results. It’s confined to whatever reagents are used on the strip, which could be a little off.

Liquid / Reagent Pool Testing Kits – This approach is a little more time consuming, but it is pretty accurate. Reagents for various testing can be obtained as a kit or as individual reagents. Ultimate customisability / you can test for any of the values you feel should be tested. To properly drop in reagents, you’ll need a firm hand.

These could be of two types: First, manual test kits with colour coding that you should interpret. Second, are the digital test kits with a device that scans the data and gives you a numeric number rather than a colour reading.

Professional pool testing – Professional pool testing is the simplest and most accurate method of pool testing, but it is also the most pricey. Collect a water sample and bring it to your local swimming pool store for testing. If things are getting out of line, this is a great alternative, but it shouldn’t go to this position with proper pool upkeep.

How To Combat Contaminants?

If you experience problems with your pool water, you may have to test more regularly. Many of these issues can be created by the quality of the water you put in your pool. Since well water has more elements, your pool water may contain more iron and copper. If the town has hard water, you’re more likely to have high calcium levels.

These pollutants can make maintaining the proper chemical balance in your pool hard, as well as discolour and physically damage pool surfaces. It’s more efficient and cost-effective to keep an eye on them and prevent damage rather than fix it later. Pool water testing is the very first step in that prevention.

How to Safely Add Chemicals To Your Pool Water

1. To ensure that chemicals are being used safely, always read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions to protect your fibreglass pool from damage.

2. Wear the proper protective gear and clothes, such as gloves, shoes, and eyewear.

3. In a well-ventilated place, handle chemicals.

4. Use separate, clear metal or plastic cups to transfer or measure chemicals. Wooden scoops should never be used.

5. Chemicals should indeed be protected against moisture and water, such as a cup of coffee or water. Even placing the wet scoop to the pail may trigger an allergic response.

6. Always dilute the chemicals by adding them to water, not the other way around, unless the container’s label indicates otherwise.

Blowing Out Pool Lines - DIY Or Call A Professional

Pool lines can tend to get clogged up over time, which is why it is recommended to call a professional if you want to get them removed. If you choose to do this yourself, it's important that you're as prepared as possible for what will actually happen. So let's look at some of the steps involved in blowing out your pool lines and see how much time it'll take.

Why blow out pool lines?

Blowing out pool lines is one of the most important things you can do to keep your pool running smoothly. Blowing out a line will remove debris, contaminants and other impurities that can build up in the line causing problems with water flow or even leaks.

The good news is that blowing out a line only takes about an hour, so it’s something you can do yourself if you have time on your hands!

Preparation to blow out the pool lines

Here are some tips that will help you prepare to blow out the pool lines:

  • Make sure the pool is empty and clean. If you have a skimmer basket that needs to be cleaned out, do so now.
  • Check for leaks in your plumbing system by taking a torch down each line. Look for water leaking from it or from around its connection point with another pipe or piece of equipment (like a pump).
  • If there are any signs of leaking pipes, check them over again before starting work on blowing out lines. It’s possible someone may have forgotten about an old patch job that still needs replacing! This can be especially frustrating when we’re dealing with metal equipment like pumps or valves that don’t show up well under normal lighting conditions. Remember to look at both sides of these components when inspecting them closely!
  • You might want to consider draining off some water from inside the pool so that you can better see what needs fixing first.

Equipment needed to blow out pool lines yourself

If you decide to blow out your pool lines yourself, a few tools will be necessary. You will need:

  • A pool vacuum
  • A pool brush
  • A net (or two) to catch any debris that may fall into the water while blowing out the lines. This could include leaves and twigs, as well as other small objects that can get sucked up by the vacuum. If this is done too quickly, it could cause damage to your pump or filter system.
  • An optional piece of equipment is a fish net that hangs over the top of the skimmer basket so debris doesn’t clog its intake area. The best option here would be one with suction cups at each end so they can easily attach themselves onto any surface area within reach–including walls! Another advantage of using these types of nets is that they allow for quick access. If something gets stuck in there during operation time, then simply removing the said item from inside won’t take very long at all!

Blowing out pool lines

The suction side

  • Use a hose with a nozzle attachment.
  • Make sure you have enough water pressure.
  • Use a pool vacuum to suck out debris from the suction side of your pool as well as any other places where debris may have been collected. This can be around your skimmer basket or pump intake tube (if applicable). It’s also important not to forget about vacuuming out any leaves that may have fallen into your pool. They will decrease its surface area and create algae growth problems later down the road!
  • Brush off the walls of your swimming pool with an electric broom until it looks clean again. This will remove any dirt stuck in crevices or cracks where it can’t be seen easily by hand scrubbing alone.

The equipment

The equipment used to clean pool lines is a combination of a vacuum and a hose. This can be purchased from your local hardware store, or you may have one in your home already (if so, great!).

Vacuum: You should purchase an electric-powered vacuum cleaner that has attachments for cleaning both sides of the hose at once. Using this type of machine is much easier than using manual vacuums because it automatically sucks dirt particles back into its base. This prevents them from blowing around inside the pool area and into other areas, such as windows and buildings nearby.

Hose: Your next step will be connecting this new electronic piece of equipment with its corresponding cleaning tool. This process involves connecting each end of the hose directly to either side’s male connector piece. Be sure not only that each end fits snugly but also that there isn’t any unnecessary slack present between them. If there were two inches too much space between two pipes, then water could leak out easily.

The best time of year to blow out your pool lines

The best time of year to blow out your pool lines is during the spring and fall. The pool is not in use, so it’s a good time to do it.

The weather conditions are usually dry during these seasons, which means less risk of damage to the surface of your pool. It also makes it easier for you to blow out all of those pesky little line things!

It's usually better to call in a professional for this kind of work

When it comes to pool cleaning, the professionals know what they’re doing. They have the right equipment and know how to avoid damaging your pool or pipes in the process. They can do it faster and more efficiently than you can—so it’s recommended that you don’t try this at home by yourself!

Conclusion

We hope that this article has given you some good advice on how to blow out your pool lines. If you’re still not sure, or if you want to learn more about pool maintenance, it’s best to contact a professional. It might cost you more, but the most important thing is that your pool is clean and safe for swimming!

Blowing Out Pool Lines - DIY Or Call A Professional

Pool lines can tend to get clogged up over time, which is why it is recommended to call a professional if you want to get them removed. If you choose to do this yourself, it's important that you're as prepared as possible for what will actually happen. So let's look at some of the steps involved in blowing out your pool lines and see how much time it'll take.

Why blow out pool lines?

Blowing out pool lines is one of the most important things you can do to keep your pool running smoothly. Blowing out a line will remove debris, contaminants and other impurities that can build up in the line causing problems with water flow or even leaks.

The good news is that blowing out a line only takes about an hour, so it’s something you can do yourself if you have time on your hands!

Preparation to blow out the pool lines

Here are some tips that will help you prepare to blow out the pool lines:

  • Make sure the pool is empty and clean. If you have a skimmer basket that needs to be cleaned out, do so now.
  • Check for leaks in your plumbing system by taking a torch down each line. Look for water leaking from it or from around its connection point with another pipe or piece of equipment (like a pump).
  • If there are any signs of leaking pipes, check them over again before starting work on blowing out lines. It’s possible someone may have forgotten about an old patch job that still needs replacing! This can be especially frustrating when we’re dealing with metal equipment like pumps or valves that don’t show up well under normal lighting conditions. Remember to look at both sides of these components when inspecting them closely!
  • You might want to consider draining off some water from inside the pool so that you can better see what needs fixing first.

Equipment needed to blow out pool lines yourself

If you decide to blow out your pool lines yourself, a few tools will be necessary. You will need:

  • A pool vacuum
  • A pool brush
  • A net (or two) to catch any debris that may fall into the water while blowing out the lines. This could include leaves and twigs, as well as other small objects that can get sucked up by the vacuum. If this is done too quickly, it could cause damage to your pump or filter system.
  • An optional piece of equipment is a fish net that hangs over the top of the skimmer basket so debris doesn’t clog its intake area. The best option here would be one with suction cups at each end so they can easily attach themselves onto any surface area within reach–including walls! Another advantage of using these types of nets is that they allow for quick access. If something gets stuck in there during operation time, then simply removing the said item from inside won’t take very long at all!

Blowing out pool lines

The suction side

  • Use a hose with a nozzle attachment.
  • Make sure you have enough water pressure.
  • Use a pool vacuum to suck out debris from the suction side of your pool as well as any other places where debris may have been collected. This can be around your skimmer basket or pump intake tube (if applicable). It’s also important not to forget about vacuuming out any leaves that may have fallen into your pool. They will decrease its surface area and create algae growth problems later down the road!
  • Brush off the walls of your swimming pool with an electric broom until it looks clean again. This will remove any dirt stuck in crevices or cracks where it can’t be seen easily by hand scrubbing alone.

The equipment

The equipment used to clean pool lines is a combination of a vacuum and a hose. This can be purchased from your local hardware store, or you may have one in your home already (if so, great!).

Vacuum: You should purchase an electric-powered vacuum cleaner that has attachments for cleaning both sides of the hose at once. Using this type of machine is much easier than using manual vacuums because it automatically sucks dirt particles back into its base. This prevents them from blowing around inside the pool area and into other areas, such as windows and buildings nearby.

Hose: Your next step will be connecting this new electronic piece of equipment with its corresponding cleaning tool. This process involves connecting each end of the hose directly to either side’s male connector piece. Be sure not only that each end fits snugly but also that there isn’t any unnecessary slack present between them. If there were two inches too much space between two pipes, then water could leak out easily.

The best time of year to blow out your pool lines

The best time of year to blow out your pool lines is during the spring and fall. The pool is not in use, so it’s a good time to do it.

The weather conditions are usually dry during these seasons, which means less risk of damage to the surface of your pool. It also makes it easier for you to blow out all of those pesky little line things!

It's usually better to call in a professional for this kind of work

When it comes to pool cleaning, the professionals know what they’re doing. They have the right equipment and know how to avoid damaging your pool or pipes in the process. They can do it faster and more efficiently than you can—so it’s recommended that you don’t try this at home by yourself!

Conclusion

We hope that this article has given you some good advice on how to blow out your pool lines. If you’re still not sure, or if you want to learn more about pool maintenance, it’s best to contact a professional. It might cost you more, but the most important thing is that your pool is clean and safe for swimming!

How Can You Backwash Your Pool Filter?

Your pool filter is responsible for catching the contaminants that are neutralized by the chlorine you add to your fibreglass pool. This is an important part of the circulation system of the pool and helps ensure the water in the pool is clean and sparkling.

You can think of the pool filter as the vacuum of the swimming pool. It's responsible for picking up dirt as well as debris. Everything is then held inside it. If this continues, then the pool filter will reach a point where it can't suck in anything else. This is when you'll need to switch the bag out from the pool filter.
You can think of the pool filter as the vacuum of the swimming pool. It's responsible for picking up dirt as well as debris. Everything is then held inside it. If this continues, then the pool filter will reach a point where it can't suck in anything else. This is when you'll need to switch the bag out from the pool filter.
The good thing about backwashing your pool filter is that you won't have to touch a lot of the gunk that comes out. Backwashing is a process every fibreglass pool owner should know about. You should know when it's time to backwash, what you need in order to do it, as well as how you can actually do it.
The good thing about backwashing your pool filter is that you won't have to touch a lot of the gunk that comes out. Backwashing is a process every fibreglass pool owner should know about. You should know when it's time to backwash, what you need in order to do it, as well as how you can actually do it.

What Does Backwashing Your Pool Filter Mean?

Backwashing a pool filter is essentially the act of cleaning the filter out, by getting rid of the gunk that has accumulated. When you backwash your pool filter, what you’re doing is reversing the direction the water flows in. The water is pushed through the back of the pool filter. It heads towards the drain port and escapes from there.

You should also know what kind of pool filter will be right for your fibreglass pool. If you have a cartridge filter, then backwashing is not right for your pool. Backwashing only works on sand filters and diatomaceous earth filters. These filters collect waste and contaminants by utilising edges that are sharp. As the contaminants start to pile up, the filter will become less and less efficient at doing its job.

This is even if you find that the sharp edges in the pool filter haven’t become smooth. The pressure within the filter will continue to ramp up. When you backwash your pool filter, you are cleaning out your filter without picking through the sand or the D.E. This way, you could also maintain the longevity of your filter. Keep in mind though, that you will need to replace your filter eventually.

When Should You Backwash Your Pool Filter?

Pool filters usually have a pressure gauge. When your fibreglass pool is being installed, note where the pressure gauge is. The number you see is the normal filter pressure range when it’s operating. As you keep using your pool filter, the psi you see in the pressure gauge will continue to increase. This is normal and there isn’t anything to worry about. Here is more information on how to properly maintain your pool.

The more contaminants your filter traps, the better it will be able to perform. However, this convenience won’t continue forever. Eventually, the space in your pool filter will be so crammed that it will no longer be able to trap any contaminants. When you see that the filter operating pressure has reached 10 psi over what the normal operating pressure you noted was, it’s time to backwash your filter.

What Do You Need In Order To Backwash Your Pool Filter?

The only thing you really need in order to backwash your pool filter is a normal backwashing hose. In case you have a D.E. filter, you may want to keep a little extra D.E. around. This is in case you need to refill your filter. People with D.E. filters usually have a little D.E. lying around.

How Can You Use A Multiport Valve To Backwash Your Pool Filter?

Do you have a multiport valve? If you do, then use these steps to backwash your pool filter. Remember that when you turn your multiport valve on, the filter should be turned off.

  1. The first thing you should do is turn off your filtration system. Nothing should be running at this moment.
  2. Then, the backwash hose will need to be connected to the waste port of the filter. This is where the backwash will soon actually take place.
  3. Now, set the multiport valve to ‘Backwash’.
  4. When you’ve done this, turn your filter system back on. Leave it for around two minutes. By this point, you have started the backwashing process.
  5. Now turn your filtration system off again. After this, set your multiport valve to the ‘Rinse’ option.
  6. Then turn the filtration system back on again and allow it to run for a minute.
  7. Now turn the filtration system off again.
  8. After this, return the multiport valve back to the ‘Filter’ position.

How Can You Use A Push-Pull Valve In Order To Backwash Your Pool Filter?

You could also have a push-pull valve. In this case, use the following steps to backwash your pool filter.

  1. First, you’ll need to turn off your filtration system. For both kinds of valves, your filtration system should first be turned off.
  2. Now, connect the backwash hose to the backwash port of the filter. This is the place where the backwashing will really happen.
  3. Now, you’ll need to open your backwash gate.
  4. After this, the filtration system should be turned on again, and left for around three minutes.
  5. Now turn the filtration system off again.
  6. Finally, close the push-pull valve.

How Do You Get Rid Of The Gunk?

Do you think that you can push the gunk that came out from backwashing your pool filter down the storm drain? Local governments generally do not support this, and you could find yourself needing to pay a fine if you do this.

So can you throw the gunk away in your septic system? This is also a no-no. If you do this, your septic system could experience a system failure. What local authorities would suggest is that you collect your backwash water, contain it, and then discharge it at a sanitary sewer. A sanitary sewer is different from a septic system or a storm drain. It’s a vegetated area located within your property.

The regulations can change depending on where you live, so make sure you do your research regarding how to dispose of the gunk.

Conclusion

Backwashing your pool filter is an important step in fibreglass pool maintenance. How you backwash your pool filter will depend on the kind of valve you have. Use this guide to learn how you can backwash your pool filter.

How Can You Backwash Your Pool Filter?

Your pool filter is responsible for catching the contaminants that are neutralized by the chlorine you add to your fibreglass pool. This is an important part of the circulation system of the pool and helps ensure the water in the pool is clean and sparkling.

You can think of the pool filter as the vacuum of the swimming pool. It's responsible for picking up dirt as well as debris. Everything is then held inside it. If this continues, then the pool filter will reach a point where it can't suck in anything else. This is when you'll need to switch the bag out from the pool filter.
You can think of the pool filter as the vacuum of the swimming pool. It's responsible for picking up dirt as well as debris. Everything is then held inside it. If this continues, then the pool filter will reach a point where it can't suck in anything else. This is when you'll need to switch the bag out from the pool filter.
The good thing about backwashing your pool filter is that you won't have to touch a lot of the gunk that comes out. Backwashing is a process every fibreglass pool owner should know about. You should know when it's time to backwash, what you need in order to do it, as well as how you can actually do it.
The good thing about backwashing your pool filter is that you won't have to touch a lot of the gunk that comes out. Backwashing is a process every fibreglass pool owner should know about. You should know when it's time to backwash, what you need in order to do it, as well as how you can actually do it.

What Does Backwashing Your Pool Filter Mean?

Backwashing a pool filter is essentially the act of cleaning the filter out, by getting rid of the gunk that has accumulated. When you backwash your pool filter, what you’re doing is reversing the direction the water flows in. The water is pushed through the back of the pool filter. It heads towards the drain port and escapes from there.

You should also know what kind of pool filter will be right for your fibreglass pool. If you have a cartridge filter, then backwashing is not right for your pool. Backwashing only works on sand filters and diatomaceous earth filters. These filters collect waste and contaminants by utilising edges that are sharp. As the contaminants start to pile up, the filter will become less and less efficient at doing its job.

This is even if you find that the sharp edges in the pool filter haven’t become smooth. The pressure within the filter will continue to ramp up. When you backwash your pool filter, you are cleaning out your filter without picking through the sand or the D.E. This way, you could also maintain the longevity of your filter. Keep in mind though, that you will need to replace your filter eventually.

When Should You Backwash Your Pool Filter?

Pool filters usually have a pressure gauge. When your fibreglass pool is being installed, note where the pressure gauge is. The number you see is the normal filter pressure range when it’s operating. As you keep using your pool filter, the psi you see in the pressure gauge will continue to increase. This is normal and there isn’t anything to worry about. Here is more information on how to properly maintain your pool.

The more contaminants your filter traps, the better it will be able to perform. However, this convenience won’t continue forever. Eventually, the space in your pool filter will be so crammed that it will no longer be able to trap any contaminants. When you see that the filter operating pressure has reached 10 psi over what the normal operating pressure you noted was, it’s time to backwash your filter.

What Do You Need In Order To Backwash Your Pool Filter?

The only thing you really need in order to backwash your pool filter is a normal backwashing hose. In case you have a D.E. filter, you may want to keep a little extra D.E. around. This is in case you need to refill your filter. People with D.E. filters usually have a little D.E. lying around.

How Can You Use A Multiport Valve To Backwash Your Pool Filter?

Do you have a multiport valve? If you do, then use these steps to backwash your pool filter. Remember that when you turn your multiport valve on, the filter should be turned off.

  1. The first thing you should do is turn off your filtration system. Nothing should be running at this moment.
  2. Then, the backwash hose will need to be connected to the waste port of the filter. This is where the backwash will soon actually take place.
  3. Now, set the multiport valve to ‘Backwash’.
  4. When you’ve done this, turn your filter system back on. Leave it for around two minutes. By this point, you have started the backwashing process.
  5. Now turn your filtration system off again. After this, set your multiport valve to the ‘Rinse’ option.
  6. Then turn the filtration system back on again and allow it to run for a minute.
  7. Now turn the filtration system off again.
  8. After this, return the multiport valve back to the ‘Filter’ position.

How Can You Use A Push-Pull Valve In Order To Backwash Your Pool Filter?

You could also have a push-pull valve. In this case, use the following steps to backwash your pool filter.

  1. First, you’ll need to turn off your filtration system. For both kinds of valves, your filtration system should first be turned off.
  2. Now, connect the backwash hose to the backwash port of the filter. This is the place where the backwashing will really happen.
  3. Now, you’ll need to open your backwash gate.
  4. After this, the filtration system should be turned on again, and left for around three minutes.
  5. Now turn the filtration system off again.
  6. Finally, close the push-pull valve.

How Do You Get Rid Of The Gunk?

Do you think that you can push the gunk that came out from backwashing your pool filter down the storm drain? Local governments generally do not support this, and you could find yourself needing to pay a fine if you do this.

So can you throw the gunk away in your septic system? This is also a no-no. If you do this, your septic system could experience a system failure. What local authorities would suggest is that you collect your backwash water, contain it, and then discharge it at a sanitary sewer. A sanitary sewer is different from a septic system or a storm drain. It’s a vegetated area located within your property.

The regulations can change depending on where you live, so make sure you do your research regarding how to dispose of the gunk.

Conclusion

Backwashing your pool filter is an important step in fibreglass pool maintenance. How you backwash your pool filter will depend on the kind of valve you have. Use this guide to learn how you can backwash your pool filter.

Swimming Pool Ladder Maintenance Tips

If you own a swimming pool, the pool ladder is an element you cannot live without. This is a necessary piece of equipment that makes it possible for people of all ages to enter and exit the pool without any issues. Additionally, its purpose goes beyond merely enhancing user convenience. The pool ladder also serves as a safety component that is fitted to speed up emergency evacuations.

Pool ladders come in several materials. But the most common materials used to make pool ladders are plastic and stainless steel. Your pool ladder can be affected by numerous kinds of stains. These include organic stains, mineral stains, and animal stains. Organic stains are greenish-brown in colour and are caused by algae blooms, leaves, or mulch. The colour of mineral stains depends on the metal causing the staining. Copper and iron stains have an orange-brownish colour, and calcium stains are almost colourless. Animal stains are caused by small animals or insects.

Cleaning plastic pool ladders

There are numerous methods you can employ to clean pool ladders made of plastic. The most important thing to remember while cleaning is to avoid messing up the pool water chemistry during the cleaning process. Some methods for cleaning plastic pool ladders include:

Magic eraser and chlorine bleach

Animal and vegetable stains are the easiest to remove. So, this approach works well for them. However, remember not to apply too much as this may lead to the development of further stains. The Magic Eraser sponges work well for removing stains off pool steps. You need a little bleach because magic erasers do not have any in them. Reduce the pool water level before you start cleaning to avoid excessive chlorine from mixing with the pool water. In this way, you will also be able to properly clean the steps. Pour the bleach on the sponge and start scrubbing. You need not scrub too hard to remove the stains, as animal and vegetable stains are not too stubborn. If you also want to clean your pool liner, avoid using bleach and use only your sponge.

Check out where your backyard is suitable for a  swimming pool!

Ascorbic acid

Mineral stains are difficult to remove completely without the help of acid of some kind. Ascorbic acid can help with mineral stains because it is quite efficient and frequently starts working right away. Too much scrubbing is not needed when you are using ascorbic acid. You should also use it in small amounts to avoid abrasions. Make sure to carefully read the directions given in the packages before you use ascorbic acid or similar chemicals. Use the appropriate amount of chemical to get the desired result. You should also follow the cleaning instructions without making any mistakes.

Check out our complete pool maintenance checklist!

To begin with, reduce the level of chlorine to 2 ppm. You can also do this by simply not adding chlorine for about a week. After that, reduce the pH to between 7.0 and 7.4. Next, add around 250 to 500 grams of the acid to about 1000 gallons of the swimming pool water. If you add too much, the chlorine in the pool will not last for long. If the stubborn stains do not come up, wait 24 hours and then add more.

Put two portions of a metal sequestrant into the pool after one hour to remove the metals. Although it may appear a bit cloudy initially, your pool will become clear soon. After that, add polyquat to prevent algae bloom.

You must consistently increase the chlorine levels over the next few days to ensure that the stains don’t reappear.

See our pool cleaner guide!

Vitamin C tablet

A major component of Vitamin C tablets is ascorbic acid. This acid is present in numerous pool cleaning chemicals. The pool steps are a smaller and more isolated area, so this technique works well for cleaning them. This is also an excellent approach to determine if the steps have mineral stains. The tablets are readily available and reasonably priced. The cleaning procedure is also extremely easy to understand and follow.

If possible, lower the water level of your swimming pool to reach the steps more easily. This will also allow you to clean without messing up the pool water chemistry during the cleaning process. Rub the discoloured regions with Vitamin C tablets. It should be simple and quick to remove the stain. You will see white splotches during this stage. You can keep using the tablets if the stains are coming off easily. This is an indication that the culprit is a metal stain.

In case you have a lot of stains, you may not want to apply the tablets to each one individually. Simply distribute a handful of tablets evenly around the pool and the steps and allow them to dissolve into the pool water. For places that are tricky to reach, use a sock filled with tablets and scrub the stains. Be gentle to avoid damaging your pool liner.

View whether fibreglass pool can be saltwater!

Cleaning stainless steel ladders

How fast the stainless steel pool ladders and rails begin to discolour depends on a number of factors, including the location of the pool and the chlorinator it uses. Stainless steel ladders and rails are cleaned on a daily and weekly basis.

Daily cleaning

Every day, use fresh water to rinse your pool rails. This will remove all the smudges and stains that may have happened when you held the rails.

Here are the many benefits of a swimming pool cabana!

Weekly cleaning

Use mild soap and warm, fresh water to clean all surfaces. Gently scrub tough stains using a soft, clean cloth. After scrubbing, rinse well with water. Using a soft and dry cloth, fully dry the area. For additional protection, spread a thin coating of premium automotive wax on the stainless steel surface. Use a nylon brush to scrub away any rust or stains that are visible.

Avoid using steel wool, abrasive cleaners, and chloride-containing cleaning products. These chemicals will harm the surface, making it more prone to corrosion and discolouration.

Here is our informative guide on pool shocking!

Removing algae from pool ladders

The procedure for removing algae is quite straightforward. You can either use freshwater or an algaecide. The majority of algae can be eliminated with water and a good scrub. However, an algaecide will be more effective for stubborn algae like black algae.

Conclusion

Cleaning the pool ladder is a crucial part of maintaining your swimming pool. You should regularly clean the pool ladders to keep the pool clean and healthy.

Pool Shocking: What Is It And Why Is It Necessary?

If you're a new pool owner, you might be wondering what you can do to maintain your pool for the sake of its safety and of course, the safety of everyone who's going to use it. In this article, we'll tell you everything you need to know about pool shocking along with its importance. We'll also touch on what you need to do to shock your pool the right way. So, without any further delay, let's dive right in!

What does pool shock refer to?

Pool shock is a term that’s used to refer to the process of raising a swimming pool’s free chlorine levels through the addition of chlorine or non-chlorine chemicals. High free chlorine levels in a swimming pool can work wonders in terms of eliminating potentially harmful microorganisms such as algae, bacteria, and chloramines.

On the other hand, if your pool’s free chlorine levels are low, these microorganisms may thrive in the pool water. Eventually, this is likely to make your pool incredibly unsafe for swimming. If you or any of your family members do swim in a microorganism-contaminated pool, there’s a high risk of disease as well.

Check out the complete pool maintenance checklist here! 

The various types of chlorine and their differences

Before you shock your pool for the first time, we feel it’s important for you to understand the various types of chlorine along with their differences:

Combined chlorine (CC): Combined chlorine or CC refers to the chlorine added to a swimming pool. The ideal CC level should be just under 0.2 parts per million (ppm).

Free chlorine (FC): Free chlorine or FC refers to the chlorine percentage in the CC that’s playing an active role in water disinfection. Ideally, FC levels should be in the range of 1 – 3 ppm.

Total chlorine (TC): Total chlorine or TC is what you get when you add the levels of CC and FC.

Breakpoint chlorination: Breakpoint chlorination is a state of chlorination that involves the shattering of chloramine molecular bonds. Once this state is reached, free chlorine levels start building up and a swimming pool starts to get sanitised.

View the top robotic pool cleaners here!

The most widely used pool shock products

In this section, we’ll take you through some pool shock products that are commonly used by pool owners, such as:

Lithium hypochlorite: Lithium hypochlorite is a pool shock product known for its quick dissolution. Products containing this typically feature 35% chlorine. You can add it to your pool without dissolving it prior to the addition. It takes around 7 – 8 hours to work, and while it’s working, it’s best to avoid swimming. However, despite lithium hypochlorite’s popularity, there are some downsides. For starters, it’s a costly pool shock solution. Also, you can only use it after dusk. Additionally, it can harm aquatic life. So, if your pool is located close to a natural water body that’s rich in aquatic life, it would be best to steer clear of lithium hypochlorite use.

Potassium peroxymonosulfate: There are some non-chlorine products you can consider to shock your pool as well. One of them is potassium peroxymonosulfate, which is one of the most affordable pool shock solutions. You can directly add it to the water whenever you please and it only 15 – 20 minutes to do its work. However, it has one major disadvantage – it cannot eliminate algae. So, if you decide to use potassium peroxymonosulfate to shock your pool, you need to invest in an algaecide separately.

Calcium hypochlorite: If lithium hypochlorite is too costly for you, why not consider calcium hypochlorite? The best thing about calcium hypochlorite is that it doesn’t harm aquatic life. However, it can raise your pool’s calcium levels, which can increase calcium hardness. Also, unlike lithium hypochlorite, calcium hypochlorite can’t be added without prior dissolving. It shares certain similarities with lithium hypochlorite as well. For example, it’s only effective when used post dusk, and it takes almost the same time to eliminate microorganisms.

Dichloroisocyanuric acid: Known also as dichlor, this chemical has a high chlorine percentage (50 – 60%). It can serve multiple purposes as well, i.e. you can use it as a pool shock solution and/or for regular chlorine doses. It takes approximately 8 hours to eliminate microorganisms, and it should be used exclusively after dusk. No dissolution is required. All in all, this is the pool shock product we recommend you to use due to its ease of use and high safety.

Here are the reasons why your pool water is cloudy!

Shocking your pool in 9 simple steps

In this last section of the article, we’ll tell you 9 simple steps you can follow to shock your pool:

Step 1 – Test your pool water: Buy a pool test kit and check your pool’s pH, FC, and TC levels. Determine the level of chlorine that should be added by deducting FC from TC, which will give you the CC level.

Step 2 – Determine how much pool shock you should mix: To do this, refer to the recommended level on the product packaging.

Step 3 – Dissolve the pool shock: If you’ve purchased a pool shock solution in granular form, dissolve it first. We recommend mixing it in a bucket (a five-gallon bucket should be fine).

Step 4 – Run the pool pump: Your pool pump should be running when you add the pool shock to the water. This will ensure that the solution is circulated evenly throughout the pool.

Step 5 – Pour the solution around the pool’s edges: To make sure that the pool shock solution has the desired effect, it’s best to pour it around the pool’s edges.

Step 6 – Keep the pool pump turned on for 7 – 8 hours: Most pool shock products require 7 – 8 hours to completely eliminate microorganisms. During this duration, the pool pump should be running continuously.

Step 7 – Test your pool water for chlorine levels: After the pool shock has done what it’s supposed to, check the chlorine levels.

Step 8 – Be patient: Continue testing the chlorine until the FC is in the range of 1 – 3 ppm.

Step 9 – Enter the pool: After the FC levels drop, feel free to take a dip in your pool.

See how sunlight can effect the chlorine in your swimming pool!

To Conclude

So, that’s about it for this article. We hope you learned a thing or two about pool shocking, its importance, and how to do it correctly. Make sure to take the help of professionals for your pool cleaning services.

Pool Shocking: What Is It And Why Is It Necessary?

If you're a new pool owner, you might be wondering what you can do to maintain your pool for the sake of its safety and of course, the safety of everyone who's going to use it. In this article, we'll tell you everything you need to know about pool shocking along with its importance. We'll also touch on what you need to do to shock your pool the right way. So, without any further delay, let's dive right in!

What does pool shock refer to?

Pool shock is a term that’s used to refer to the process of raising a swimming pool’s free chlorine levels through the addition of chlorine or non-chlorine chemicals. High free chlorine levels in a swimming pool can work wonders in terms of eliminating potentially harmful microorganisms such as algae, bacteria, and chloramines.

On the other hand, if your pool’s free chlorine levels are low, these microorganisms may thrive in the pool water. Eventually, this is likely to make your pool incredibly unsafe for swimming. If you or any of your family members do swim in a microorganism-contaminated pool, there’s a high risk of disease as well.

Check out the complete pool maintenance checklist here! 

The various types of chlorine and their differences

Before you shock your pool for the first time, we feel it’s important for you to understand the various types of chlorine along with their differences:

Combined chlorine (CC): Combined chlorine or CC refers to the chlorine added to a swimming pool. The ideal CC level should be just under 0.2 parts per million (ppm).

Free chlorine (FC): Free chlorine or FC refers to the chlorine percentage in the CC that’s playing an active role in water disinfection. Ideally, FC levels should be in the range of 1 – 3 ppm.

Total chlorine (TC): Total chlorine or TC is what you get when you add the levels of CC and FC.

Breakpoint chlorination: Breakpoint chlorination is a state of chlorination that involves the shattering of chloramine molecular bonds. Once this state is reached, free chlorine levels start building up and a swimming pool starts to get sanitised.

View the top robotic pool cleaners here!

The most widely used pool shock products

In this section, we’ll take you through some pool shock products that are commonly used by pool owners, such as:

Lithium hypochlorite: Lithium hypochlorite is a pool shock product known for its quick dissolution. Products containing this typically feature 35% chlorine. You can add it to your pool without dissolving it prior to the addition. It takes around 7 – 8 hours to work, and while it’s working, it’s best to avoid swimming. However, despite lithium hypochlorite’s popularity, there are some downsides. For starters, it’s a costly pool shock solution. Also, you can only use it after dusk. Additionally, it can harm aquatic life. So, if your pool is located close to a natural water body that’s rich in aquatic life, it would be best to steer clear of lithium hypochlorite use.

Potassium peroxymonosulfate: There are some non-chlorine products you can consider to shock your pool as well. One of them is potassium peroxymonosulfate, which is one of the most affordable pool shock solutions. You can directly add it to the water whenever you please and it only 15 – 20 minutes to do its work. However, it has one major disadvantage – it cannot eliminate algae. So, if you decide to use potassium peroxymonosulfate to shock your pool, you need to invest in an algaecide separately.

Calcium hypochlorite: If lithium hypochlorite is too costly for you, why not consider calcium hypochlorite? The best thing about calcium hypochlorite is that it doesn’t harm aquatic life. However, it can raise your pool’s calcium levels, which can increase calcium hardness. Also, unlike lithium hypochlorite, calcium hypochlorite can’t be added without prior dissolving. It shares certain similarities with lithium hypochlorite as well. For example, it’s only effective when used post dusk, and it takes almost the same time to eliminate microorganisms.

Dichloroisocyanuric acid: Known also as dichlor, this chemical has a high chlorine percentage (50 – 60%). It can serve multiple purposes as well, i.e. you can use it as a pool shock solution and/or for regular chlorine doses. It takes approximately 8 hours to eliminate microorganisms, and it should be used exclusively after dusk. No dissolution is required. All in all, this is the pool shock product we recommend you to use due to its ease of use and high safety.

Here are the reasons why your pool water is cloudy!

Shocking your pool in 9 simple steps

In this last section of the article, we’ll tell you 9 simple steps you can follow to shock your pool:

Step 1 – Test your pool water: Buy a pool test kit and check your pool’s pH, FC, and TC levels. Determine the level of chlorine that should be added by deducting FC from TC, which will give you the CC level.

Step 2 – Determine how much pool shock you should mix: To do this, refer to the recommended level on the product packaging.

Step 3 – Dissolve the pool shock: If you’ve purchased a pool shock solution in granular form, dissolve it first. We recommend mixing it in a bucket (a five-gallon bucket should be fine).

Step 4 – Run the pool pump: Your pool pump should be running when you add the pool shock to the water. This will ensure that the solution is circulated evenly throughout the pool.

Step 5 – Pour the solution around the pool’s edges: To make sure that the pool shock solution has the desired effect, it’s best to pour it around the pool’s edges.

Step 6 – Keep the pool pump turned on for 7 – 8 hours: Most pool shock products require 7 – 8 hours to completely eliminate microorganisms. During this duration, the pool pump should be running continuously.

Step 7 – Test your pool water for chlorine levels: After the pool shock has done what it’s supposed to, check the chlorine levels.

Step 8 – Be patient: Continue testing the chlorine until the FC is in the range of 1 – 3 ppm.

Step 9 – Enter the pool: After the FC levels drop, feel free to take a dip in your pool.

See how sunlight can effect the chlorine in your swimming pool!

To Conclude

So, that’s about it for this article. We hope you learned a thing or two about pool shocking, its importance, and how to do it correctly. Make sure to take the help of professionals for your pool cleaning services.

Reasons Why Your Pool Water Is Cloudy And What You Can Do About It

Is your pool water cloudy and you aren't sure why or how to fix it? There are quite a few ways to fix this problem - read on to find out!

If you find that the water in your fibreglass pool is dirty, then this could be due to seven reasons. These include:

⦁ Improper chlorine levels
⦁ The pH is imbalanced
⦁ The alkalinity is imbalanced
⦁ The calcium hardness levels are high

⦁ Improper chlorine levels
⦁ The pH is imbalanced
⦁ The alkalinity is imbalanced
⦁ The calcium hardness levels are high

⦁ The filter is either clogged or faulty
⦁ It could indicate the early stages of the growth of algae
⦁ Due to ammonia or debris

⦁ The filter is either clogged or faulty
⦁ It could indicate the early stages of the growth of algae
⦁ Due to ammonia or debris

How Can You Clear The Cloudy Water From Your Pool?

There are seven things that you need to do in order to ensure that the water in your pool isn’t cloudy. These include:

⦁ The free chlorine levels should be balanced
⦁ Ammonia should be eliminated
⦁ Young algae should be eliminated
⦁ The pH and TA levels need to be monitored

⦁ The free chlorine levels should be balanced
⦁ Ammonia should be eliminated
⦁ Young algae should be eliminated
⦁ The pH and TA levels need to be monitored

⦁ The calcium hardness levels need to be corrected
⦁ The filter may need to be backwashed or the filtering agent replaced
⦁ Foreign particles including mineral deposits need to be scrubbed and vacuumed

⦁ The calcium hardness levels need to be corrected
⦁ The filter may need to be backwashed or the filtering agent replaced
⦁ Foreign particles including mineral deposits need to be scrubbed and vacuumed

Taking A Free Chlorine Reading Of Your Pool

If there are low levels of free chlorine in the water, then this can commonly turn the water in your fibreglass pool cloudy. When there are low levels of free chlorine, this indicated that there is chloramine in the water. As a result, the water turns cloudy and smells more like chlorine.

When there is too much chloramine in the pool water, the chlorine will not be able to sanitize your pool. As a result, algae and ammonia can grow more rapidly.

The first thing you should do is measure how much free or combined chlorine there is in the water. Deduct the amount of free chlorine in the water from the total chlorine to get the combined chlorine levels.

Check out our home pool heating tips!

When your free chlorine is below 3 ppm or if your combined chlorine is more than 0.5 ppm, you’ll need to shock your swimming pool. This is essential in order to kill bacteria in the water before your pool gets algae or even ammonia.

Should you have a saltwater pool and it turns cloudy, then the damage has been done. You’ll need to raise the percentage set within the saltwater chlorine generator or just running the pump alone will not help you clear out the cloudy water.

You’ll need to shut down your saltwater chlorine generators and then manually shock the pool with the help of harsh chlorine.

Ammonia or Algae?

There are times, such as when summer is beginning and the pool is opening after winter, when you may find that the water has turned cloudy. If the free chlorine as well as cyanuric acid levels in the water are from 0 or come close to 0 ppm, then that means that the level of combined chlorine is very high.

Your fibreglass pool needs more chlorine but the level of free chlorine in the water will not rise easily. If this happens to you, then this could fixate that your pool has ammonia. You will need the help of a lot of chlorine to get rid of ammonia from your fibreglass pool.

Another problem you may encounter is algae. During the early stages, algae can make your pool water look dull as well as cloudy. If you want to make sure whether the problem is really algae or not, then do an overnight chlorine loss test. To do this, you’ll need to add chlorine to your pool after the Sun goes down. The next morning, take a free chlorine reading. If the levels of free chlorine drop by at least 1 ppm over the night, then that means that the problem is algae. You’ll need to shock your pool as well as deep clean it to get rid of algae.

Not sure about whether to should install your pool indoors or outdoors? Check out our post on the topic!

Other Reasons Why Your Pool Water Can Be Cloudy

These include:

Imbalance Of Chemicals

Your pool water could either have too much of, or too little chlorine. The pH level, the alkalinity, the calcium hardness or stabilizer levels could be imbalanced.

The Filter Could Be Faulty

When there's poor filtration, then this can indicate that you may not be running your pool filter for long enough. Your filter cartridges could also be worn out or need replacing. There could also be scaling on the filter as well.

Mineral Deposits, Environmental Factors, Debris

It's possible for dust, pollen as well as leaves to build up in the filter and impede the process of cleaning. Insects or even bird droppings could make their way into your pool. Water from rain or after a storm can introduce minerals such as phosphates, nitrates and silicates into your pool. These can also make the water of your pool more cloudy.

How To Tell Which Pool Chemical Is Actually Imbalanced

In order to be able to tell which chemicals might be imbalanced, you’ll need a fast, accurate and simple-to-use test kit. Get a test kit that tests pH levels, the amount of free chlorine, combined chlorine and total chlorine. Your test kit should also test bromine, total alkalinity, calcium hardness and the amount of cyanuric acid in your pool.

There are test kits that can detect metals such as iron, copper, and even biguanide. The recommended levels of chlorine in your pool water should be 3 ppm. This should be the same as the total chlorine, provided the chloramphenicol is 0 ppm.

Here are the top solar pool covers!

Free Chlorine, Combined Chlorine and Total Chlorine: What Are They?

Free chlorine is the amount of available chlorine that can be used to sanitize the water in your fibreglass pool. Combined chlorine, on the other hand, is the chlorine that has been used up. It could also be oxidized or diluted with compounds of nitrogen and ammonia within the water.

Combined chlorine cannot disinfect and kill microorganisms. The total chlorine in the water is the sum of the free chlorine with the combined chlorine.

Check out the complete pool maintenance checklist!

Conclusion

There are seven main reasons why the water in your fibreglass pool could turn cloudy. First, you’ll need to isolate what is causing the water to turn cloudy before you can resolve the issue. Use this guide to learn more about what causes the water in the pool to turn cloudy, as well as what you can do about it.

Here Are the Top Solar Pool Covers for 2022!

An open pool may look gorgeous from a distance, but if you're its owner, you're in for a lot of hassle. Think about it - from debris falling into the water to the water losing heat rapidly to direct exposure to the sun's UV rays. Simply put, you need to consider buying a pool cover to keep these issues and their consequences at bay.

Right now, the options in the market are almost endless, which makes it confusing for buyers to buy the best solar pool covers for their vinyl liner, concrete, and fibreglass pools. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of the best solar pool covers in 2021. Read on to know all about their features, pros, and cons.

Want to know more about why pool covers are important? Find out here!

VINGLI Pool Cover Reel Set

VINGLI is one of the most well-known names in the world of solar pool covers. This product combines a reel mechanism with a solar cover, which makes it easy to roll during periods when you’re not using it. It also doesn’t have any separate storage requirements.

So, in terms of efficiency and storage conservation, this product is quite good. It can cover a 14 x 18 feet area, which makes it compatible with large pools. Handling the cover is easy thanks to a 13.8″ handle. The lockable telescopic tube reduces shocks and vibrations when you use the reel.

It’s quite durable as well, as it has a stainless steel construction. Portability is ensured by the tires, which are quite solid and strong. The only con we could think of while reviewing this cover and reel set is the assembly, which you’ll have to do by yourself.

Pros:

  • Reel mechanism for easy setup and storage
  • Suitable for large pools
  • Handle and lockable telescopic tube for convenient use
  • Durable stainless steel construction
  • Solid tires for portability

Cons:

  • DIY assembly

Blue Wave NS520

If you’re looking for premium performance, there’s no better solar pool cover right now than the NS520 from Blue Wave. The brand’s products have always been impressive, and this one is also quite a feature-rich product.

It features a plastic material that’s 14 mil thick, and it can cover pools up to 16 x 32 feet area. The cover also features thermal bubbles that reduces evaporation by up to 95% for minimal heat loss.

It’s UV-resistant as well, which makes it perfect for those who don’t want to put in too much effort towards maintaining chlorine levels. There’s a 6-year warranty as well.

Pros:

  • 14 mil cover thickness
  • Thermal bubbles for minimal heat loss and reduced evaporation
  • UV-resistance
  • 6-year warranty

Cons:

  • None

Sun2Solar 1200 Series Solar Pool Cover

The Sun2Solar 1200 Series is a solar pool cover that looks good and performs even better. It’s a great fit for small rectangular pools, and has tiny bubbles all over the cover, which keeps the harmful effects of UV rays at bay while transferring heat to the water.

It is a 4 x 8 feet cover that also reduces water evaporation. You can attach this product to a roller as well, which will make it incredibly easy to set it up and remove it. Trimming it is possible too, making it compatible with small rectangular pools of varying sizes.

The best thing about this product is its 8-year warranty. The only weakness is that it can’t be used for bigger pools.

Pros:

  • Visually appealing
  • UV-resistant bubbles
  • Reduced water evaporation
  • Attachable to dedicated rollers
  • 8-year warranty

Cons:

  • Only compatible with small rectangular pools

Intex Solar Pool Cover

Intex’s swimming pool products are incredibly popular, and the brand doesn’t disappoint with this solar pool cover. This is a circular cover that features a diameter of 12 feet. However, you can also use it if you have a small rectangular pool.

It’s a heat-retaining cover that reduces evaporation by up to 95% without causing any changes to the water temperature. It also has additional holes for draining excess water. This prevents water accumulation and makes it ideal for both outdoor and indoor above ground pools.

The cover’s small size, along with the provided reusable carry bag allows it to be stored without any hassles. The only con of this product is its limited 1-year warranty.

Pros:

  • Ideal for circular pools and small rectangular pools
  • Heat retention and reduced evaporation
  • Prevents water accumulation
  • Compatible with both outdoor and indoor above ground pools
  • Reusable carry bag provided with the product

Cons:

  • 1-year warranty
  • Not compatible with in-ground pools

Bestway Solar Pool Cover

This solar pool cover from Bestway is meant for above-ground pools and it has a diameter of 14 feet. This diameter allows the cover to be compatible with almost all above-ground pool sizes.

It’s the most effective at keeping debris out, but it also performs decently in terms of retaining heat. The cover provides a snug fit, and you won’t have to worry about it coming loose.

A carry bag comes free with the cover, which makes it easy to store it and move it around. The only major disappointment is the 90-day warranty, which is well under the warranty periods offered by its competitors.

Pros:

  • Compatible with almost all above-ground pools
  • High on durability
  • Easy to use and store
  • Lots of options to choose from in terms of size

Cons:

  • 90-day warranty

In The Swim Solar Pool Cover

In The Swim’s products are known for their durability and features, and this pool cover from the brand is both durable and feature-rich. It has an 18 feet diameter and a thickness of 12 mil.

It’s one of the best in terms of heat retention, and you can expect your pool water’s temperature to rise by 8 – 10 degrees within just seven days of installation.
The product comes with a 7-year warranty and the best thing about it is that it’s quite affordable for all the pros it provides.

Pros:

  • 18 feet diameter
  • Significant heat retention capabilities
  • 7-year warranty
  • Affordable

Cons:

  • Trimming may be required for smaller pools

Conclusion

So, we’ve reached the end of this post, and we’ve done our best to include the very best solar pool covers in 2021. If you have a concrete, vinyl liner, or fibreglass pool, make sure to consider purchasing one of these pool covers for added convenience.

Feel free to chat to our friendly team today if you have any questions!

Here Is How You Can Protect Your Pool From Lotions Such As Sunscreen and Tanning Oils

Tanning oils and sunscreen lotions go a long way in keeping people safe from the sun's UV rays on the sunniest summer days. However, the same products can have several negative effects on your swimming pool.

In this post, we’re going to tell you all about the damage that sunscreen, tanning oils, and other lotions can do to your concrete, vinyl liner, or fibreglass pool. So, without any further delays, let’s get right into it!

Click here for a complete pool maintenance checklist!

The effects of lotions on pool water

Lotions are oily substances, and you probably already know oil and water don’t mix. So, when you enter a swimming pool with a thick layer of oil on your body, there’s a high chance that the oil will slide off and float to the water’s surface. The most evident effect that this has on the pool water is the oily rainbow-like appearance. Not only will the water feel slimy, but there’s also a possibility that on its way up to the surface, the oils will collect dirt and grime. This will make the water look and feel dirty – not what you’d want, right?

There’s also the chance that the excess oils will interfere with the pool water chemistry. Maintaining the pool water chemistry is vital for keeping the swimming pool safe. It involves a variety of elements such as pH, total alkalinity, chlorine, total dissolved solids (TDS) and calcium hardness – all of which play crucial roles in maintaining water quality. So, all in all, it’s fair to say that lotions such as sunscreen and tanning oils aren’t any good for your swimming pool’s water. But does this mean that you can’t apply any lotion before you enter the pool on a hot summer’s day?

Tips to minimize the effects of oily lotions on swimming pools

Spending time in the sun with some oil on the body can help you relax and unwind before you hit the water. However, to keep the oil’s effects at bay, we recommend putting into practice the following tips:

Install an outdoor shower

Have you ever been to a public pool at a resort? If you have, you’d have probably noticed signs that ask swimmers to take a shower before they make their way into the pool. Why do you think that’s the case? Well, the reason why public pools ask swimmers to do this is simple – showering before entering the pool ensures the removal of excess oils. Simply put, doing this will keep the oils from the lotions from making their way into the pool water. That’s why we recommend you install an outdoor shower. It doesn’t have to be anything fancy – simply being functional will do. And, of course, ask both your family and your guests to wash their bodies well before they enter the pool.

Add algaecide and/or enzyme treatments

Even if a ton of oil gets into your swimming pool, it doesn’t mean you have to flush all of the water out. There are some products like enzyme treatments and algaecides that will help you deal with the oil. While enzyme treatments remove oils from water, algaecides can help the oil to clump together, which makes it easy for you to remove the oil manually. If you’re using an algaecide, give it some time to collect the oils. Use a skimmer (preferably with a fine mesh and a long handle) to skim the water surface manually for removing the collected oils.

Perform routine filter cleaning

Irrespective of the type of filter your pool has, make sure that you clean it regularly. Both sand and cartridge filters can be affected by high oil content. As a result, your pool water may start to appear greenish with black oil deposits – a truly ugly sight. The best way to deal with this issue is to clean your pool filter at least once every week (if you’re a frequent pool user). If you have a cartridge filter, replace the cartridge every week for the best results. The point of this filter cleaning exercise is simple – to eliminate filter inefficiencies brought about by excessive exposure to oil content.

Apply lotions properly by following use directions

The problem with most people who enter swimming pools with an absurd amount of oil on their bodies is that they don’t apply lotions the way they’re supposed to. If you look closely at the directions mentioned on the packaging, you’ll find that users are asked to wait 20 – 30 minutes before exposing their skin to water post-application. This waiting period allows the skin to absorb most of the oil content, which drastically reduces the oil quantity that slides off your body into the pool. Also, when applying the products, make sure that you rub them thoroughly. Casually applying them leads to the use of more oil than necessary.

Check pool water chemistry regularly

Even though the previous tips will significantly lower the amount of oil that enters your swimming pool, the fact is that some amount will still be making its way into the water. While minimal oil content won’t make too much of a difference, over time, the oil content in the water may increase. To track how much the oils are affecting the pool water, it’s best to conduct regular pool water chemistry checks. Through these checks, you can find out the elements of the pool water chemistry that have been disturbed by the oil content. For example, the accumulation of oil may reduce chlorine levels, which you’ll get to know about through a pool water chemistry check. You can correct the situation by adding more chlorine.

Click here for some tips on how to save time cleaning your pool!

Conclusion

When oily lotions get inside the water of your vinyl liner, concrete, or fibreglass pool, its water quality may get severely deteriorated. That’s why it’s essential that you adopt the tips that we shared with you in this post. Putting them all into practice will ensure the safety of not just your swimming pool, but of all those people who want to have a relaxing time in it. So, we hope you learned a thing or two from this post. Here’s to a sweet summer experience in your backyard!

Here Are 5 Of The Most Beneficial Ways That You Can Save On Energy Costs With Your Pool!

Pleasant memories and peaceful moments are not the only things a backyard pool will bring in your life. It will also bring a long list of additional costs that could substantially add to your monthly expenses. If you are not smart about it, cleaning and maintenance of a pool can take a toll on your pocket.

While we want you to enjoy the pool time with your family and friends, we also want you to be energy efficient. You can save more than you think by following some smart yet simple tips. Here are five simple ways to save on energy costs if you have a pool or are planning to get one.

Manage the Flora

This might almost sound dumb, but you can save a decent amount by simply managing the trees and plants growing in the backyard. A lot of people make the mistake of planting trees close to their swimming pools. While trees can provide a natural shade for your pool and add a sense of serenity around your pool area, they are also the single biggest source of trash in your pool. Fallen leaves from trees and other plants not only add to the trash but also attract insects that eventually end up in your pool. Additionally, the roots of some trees might pose a problem to the plumbing system of your pool. If a tree is too close, it might even fracture the walls of your pool.

Now, we are not suggesting getting rid of all the trees in your backyard. We just want you to be a little smart about the position of the trees and plants around the pool. Ensure that you plant trees in such a way that they have enough space to grow away from your pool. Consider the growth both above and below the ground before choosing a spot for a new tree. If you are yet to get your pool installed, consider this aspect while deciding a place for it. Just this simple consideration will save you a lot of maintenance and cleaning costs.

Switch to an Energy Efficient Pump

A pool pump is not only one of the most basic pieces of equipment in a pool, but it is also a big contributor to your electricity bill. If you want to cut down on energy costs, you will have to look for a more efficient solution than your regular pump.

While you will have to consider a few things, deciding which pool pump will serve your requirements and still save you money is no rocket science. There are two main elements when it comes to choosing the appropriate pump for your pool – the size of the pool and the rating of the pump.

You will be surprised by the number of options available in the market. Try to get a small but efficient pump for your pool. You can also consult an expert in case you are unsure about the rating that would suffice your pool’s pumping requirements.

Use a Pump Timer

If you like the idea of having an energy-efficient pump, you will love using a pump timer.

Once you get an energy-efficient pump, combine it with a pump timer, and you can proudly proclaim to be a super saver. An appropriately rated pump does not need to run all the time. You just need to keep it operational for a particular part of the day. All you need to do is figure out how long you should keep the pool pump running. It will again depend upon factors like your pool size, water quality and the frequency at which the pool is being used. You can consult a professional to determine this duration. Once you do this, you can use a timer and operate your pump for only a fixed number of hours.

Initially, it might take you a little while to figure out the perfect timings to keep the pump operational. But, once you get a hold of it, you will be pleasantly surprised looking at your savings.

Try Solar Pool Covers

Another big enemy in our fight to save energy costs with our swimming pool is evaporation. Filling the pool with water using a pump and then heating it to a suitable temperature takes up a lot of energy units. All this, only to see the water evaporate. This not only adds to your electricity bill but also wastes a lot of water.

While it is impossible to prevent it, you can always find ways to cut down the rate of evaporation. One of the most effective ways to do this is using solar pool covers. Pool covers work on a simple principle – the less exposed the water surface, the lesser the evaporation. Just by covering the water surface, you can cut down evaporation by more than 80%.

Solar pool covers provide additional benefits too. They allow heat from the sun to pass into the water and trap it. As a result, they act as water heaters, raising the water temperature during the day and reducing the heat loss during the night.

There is a wide range of pool covers available in the market. You can choose one which fits your purpose and budget.

Consider a Windbreak

This is another simple yet effective method to cut down the water loss due to evaporation. Wind is a major factor affecting evaporation. Wind takes away water molecules closer to the surface, accelerating the rate of evaporation considerably. A windbreak, as the name suggests, obstructs the wind blowing across your pool. This will reduce the rate of evaporation and save a lot of your pool water over time.

The best part of a windbreak is that it is simple to install. You can simply deploy it over a fence around the pool. People prefer windbreaks over pool covers because one has to get the pool covers off to use the pool, whereas there is no such issue with a windbreak.

With these tips, you’ll be able to enjoy your pool time without any worries! Give us a call today if you have any questions about energy costs with your pool!

An Informative Guide To Help You With The Alkalinity In Your Pool

A pool is a great place to make memories and spend sunny days with friends and families. You can host parties and barbecues and the pool will look great as a backdrop. No matter what the occasion, your pool will always be there and add an aesthetically pleasing vibe to your backyard.

Your pool owning experience will depend on how you take care of your pool and how good you are at maintaining it. A pool is a complex system that includes a lot of aspects that need regular upkeep. Whether it be the valves or the chemical balance, your pool will require to check them from time to time.

It is in your best interest to look after your pool on a weekly basis and if you see any signs of malfunctioning. A well-kept pool will have clear water without any debris and coloration and also not cause any kind of irritation.

Alkalinity and why is it important?

Alkalinity can be said to be the volume of water that is engaged in fighting against acidification. It is the measurement of the ability of your pool water to neutralize acids and bases that may be in the system while maintaining the pH. Your pool should have an 80-120ppm alkalinity level and anything that deviates from this can cause problems.

Balancing the chemicals in your pool should be your number one priority as it can cause a lot of problems. A pool’s chemical balance is delicate and can be disrupted even by the most minor causes -whether it be the heat or wind or debris landing in the pool. Changes in alkalinity can cause structural problems and rot away the metal near the pool too.

How to alter the total alkalinity

You can use a testing kit to measure the alkalinity of your pool. These are not very expensive and widely available. Ideally, your pool’s alkalinity should be between 80-120ppm. If it is below 80, then there is no need to worry. All you have to do is add baking soda to the pool. This helps increase the pH levels which makes the pool more basic or alkaline.

If you have levels of more than 120ppm then you need to increase the acidity of the pool. This can be easily achieved using sodium bisulfate or muriatic acid. High alkalinity can cause problems in the pool’s circulation and filter system. The salts deposit on the walls of the pipe which can corrode them later on. The same is the case for lower pH levels. Lower pH levels indicate acidity in the pool which can easily corrode the metal in and around the pool.

PH levels

When you identify the pH level of your pool you are measuring the acidity or the basicity of the pool water. It can be easily determined by a litmus test. If you have acidity levels less than 7, then your pool is acidic. But if it is above 7 that means that the pool is basic. Both are bad news but worry not, there are easy remedies to your problem here.

PH levels in real life – If the pH is 1 then that means that the thing you tested is very acidic in nature. For example, Gastric acid and sulfuric acid will have these stats. If you test tomato juice you will find that even though it is acidic it only has a rating of 4. On the pH scale 1 is stronger than 4 before the number 7 and after that 10 will be stronger than 7.

Water should have a neutral pH level so that it can be used for a variety of purposes. Some basic things are baking soda, which has a rating of 9 while bleach has a rating of 14. Bleach has a lot of chlorine that has disinfecting properties. This is the main reason why chlorine is used to keep your pool water clean and operational. Here are the top robotic pool cleaners in 2021!

How does the alkalinity of your pool increase?

Alkalinity rises when your pH level rises. This means that the water in your pool is now more basic than it was before. PH and alkalinity levels can rise due to a number of reasons. Products like oils, alcohol, and sunblock increase the pH of your thus raising the level of alkalinity.

If you over-shock your pool after heavy usage on a weekend then the chances of raising the alkalinity are high. Be careful with the shock and use it in moderation only.

How to decrease it?

Lowering your pH levels will bring down the alkalinity in your pool. To make your pool more neutral when it is basic, it is best to add something acidic. The pool’s pH levels can drop after heavy rains or even sweat.

Chlorine is a double-edged sword. If you use too much chlorine, it will disintegrate into the pool and drastically lower the pH levels. Generally, muriatic acid is used to lower the pH levels in case of high alkalinity. Being an acid, it brings the pH down and results in neutral pH water.

It is in your best interest to balance the pH levels and alkalinity in your pool. High alkalinity causes skin irritation and corrodes the parts while high acidity also has the same effects. You should check the pH of your pool twice a week and if you have doubt go to the professionals to get your sample checked. If your alkalinity is low it will also turn your pool water green and cause eye irritation too.

High alkalinity also turns your pool cloudy and there is a buildup of inorganic material on the surface of the pool and the equipment. Here is our complete guide to swimming pool cleaners!

Wind and Sun

PH and chemical balance can also be altered due to heavy wind and higher temperatures. The wind evaporates the top layer of the pool which decreases the water content in the pool. This as a product increases the concentration of the chemicals in the pool.

Higher temperatures also do the same thing and a few sunny days are enough to mess up the chemical balance. That is why we recommend that you check the pH levels of your pool at least twice a week.

The balance is delicate and it is up to you as a responsible pool owner to make sure it is maintained. Take proactive steps to ensure this and you will be a happy pool owner.

Pool chemistry can be hard to grasp if you’re new to it. You have to take a lot of precautions and there are several ways to reach the same result. Experienced pool owners will tell you how easy it is to mess up this balance and overdo the chemicals that need to be added.

If you are not sure about how to go about this, contact a professional pool service. They will be more than happy to answer your doubt and keep the chemical balance of your pool in check for you.

Your pool-owning experience will be hassle-free if you keep up to date on your pool needs. Regular maintenance and upkeep go a long way when it comes to pools. Having an optimum chemical balance in your pool is an art form that can only be bettered with practice. Be patient and practice it regularly to get a hang of it. Here is our amazing guide on how to keep on top of your swimming pool water!

Here are the Top Robotic Pool Cleaners in 2021!

Owning a pool can be a wonderful experience. When maintained properly it is the site where you will make cherished memories and a sight to behold as well. It is a great investment if you live in a hotter area as it increases the value of the property as well.

Not only that it also provides you with an easy cool down solution right in the comfort of your home. But imagine one day you decide to take a dip in the pool and you find all the debris and dirt in it. This is a situation that most experienced pool owners are aware of.

It not only postpones your pool activities but also can be hazardous for your pool system. Maintaining a pool is not the easiest task but it is not that tough either. You just need to check it twice a week and depending on your filtration system backwash it once a while.

As technology has progressed forwards now there are Robotic Pool Cleaners that can do the work for you. They do all of the heavy lifting so that you can enjoy your pool whenever you want whether it is dirty or not. They work at a higher pace than a human would and are far more efficient when it comes to pool cleaning. In 2021 most of these are low-maintenance, environmentally friendly, and energy-efficient at the same time. The combination of these features makes these a must-have in this day and age.

Here are a few things that you should consider before getting a Robotic Pool Cleaner for your pool

Cord

If you have a big pool then you’ll need a cleaner with a long cord and mechanical swivel. The combination of these two reduces the tangling that might have occurred and your pool gets cleaned more efficiently.

Filters

A cleaner with multiple filter options is your best bet for the best cleaning. Different filters serve different purposes and can filter out the debris in no time.

Cleaning

Make sure you get a cleaner that serves your purposes. Most cleaners are specialized and will clean either only the floors, surfaces, or sides. The best option is to buy one that can clean both the floor and walls of the pool.

Different cleaners are specialized for different pools here are a few cleaners that are outstanding in their categories.

For above-ground pools

Dolphin E10

Above ground, pools are a great way to install a pool even if you do not have a lot of area to spare. They add aesthetic appeal to your place and also give you respite from the heat.

For such pools, the Dolphin E10 is the perfect cleaning companion. With its reusable mesh basket, it can clean a 30 feet pool in about an hour and half. It is a great cleaner if you are looking to clean the bottom of your above-ground pool then this is the best choice in the market. Priced at the $500 mark it might seem a bit expensive to most but think of all the time you would be saving while cleaning the pool. You cannot put a price on that.

For smaller pools with a flat bottom

OT QOMOTOP

The OT QOMOTOP is a budget option for people looking for functionality over form factor. With a cleaning time of 1.5 hours and a reusable mesh tray, this cleaner is a bargain at $349. It can clean anything that doesn’t have a slope of more than 15 degrees and can clean a 40×20 feet pool in 1.5 hours.

The battery is another added bonus that makes your life easier. It can run up to 90 minutes on its 5,000 mAh battery and comes with a tow-rope to recover it when it stops.

For concrete pools

Hayward PoolVac XL

Concrete pools are some of the most widely used pools since the inception of them. They are easy to maintain once you get a hang of them and last you a long time. The Hayward PoolVacXL is one of the best cleaners for such pools as its strong suction gets rid of the dirt in all the crevices.

There is also a model dedicated to vinyl pools which costs less than the concrete cleaning counterpart. It connects to the pool filter and is capable of cleaning a pool up to 40 feet in size.

For Large Pools

Polaris F9550

Large pools are a source of joy for people with big families or someone who hosts events in their backyard too. The same size pools can also be found in hotels and other properties where people like to soak up the sun.

Since they are larger they need much more powerful cleaners that can take on heavy-duty stuff. The Polaris F9550 Sport is perfect for such tasks. It has the longest chord that is available in the market and comes with companion remotes. You can literally use it like an RC car and keep it running for a week without any interference. When the mesh canister gets full you will get a notification.

Auto-vacs like these are much easier to handle than cordless robotic cleaners. You will have to find a charging point for them when they are low on battery and plug them in. They are not operational while charging and if they die on your way you will have to wait. Auto vacs usually have very long cords so you do not have to worry about such things.

Best all-round cleaner

Dolphin Premier

You are ready to spend some money on an all-in-one solution and looking for a great cleaner that fits the bill. End your search with the Dolphin Premier that not only cleans the bottom of the pool but also the walls and waterline. Its remote is sold separately though.

It has multiple filters and can capture debris of any size or shape. It can clean a 50foot pool in about 3 hours and 4 different filter types in it. For different filtration needs, you will need to change out the filters often. But if it’s mostly leaves and bugs then a single filter would do the trick too.

Dolphin Nautilus CC Plus

One of the best-selling cleaners in the market the Dolphin Nautilus CC Plus is a great option for anyone looking for an all-rounder. Coming in at $600 the CC Pus is a great option but it is only applicable on pools up to 33 feet long. It can clean them in 2 hours and its reusable mesh cartridges make it easy to use and economical.

Its higher-end variant the CC Supreme has smart connectivity and can be remotely controlled through a smartphone app. It has 3 cleaning speeds and can clean pools up to 50 feet in length.

Choosing a robotic pool cleaner can be a daunting task. It is not easy to pick one without researching quite a few of them. Talk to pool owners who have similar pools and see what they are using. You can always consult an expert, and they will be more than happy to help you out.

Analyze what your needs are and then find a robotic cleaner that would suit your needs. Make your pool owning experience easier with these robotic pool cleaners and use the time you saved to enjoy your pool.

How To Vacuum Your Fibreglass Pool

Sometimes your pool can have organic matter or dirt that your trusty skimmer simply cannot reach. For these types of occasions, you’ll need to rely on your pool vacuum to keep your pool looking its best. Thankfully, vacuuming is a pain-free process that is easy to pick up and integrate into your current cleaning schedule. 

The Advantages Of Vacuuming Your Pool Yourself

Vacuuming your pool can come off as an overwhelming idea at first, especially if you haven’t used one before. The vacuum tool is quite different from a skimmer and has a few more components that you will need to be aware of. 

However, doing your own vacuuming can provide plenty of benefits:

  1. Vacuuming your pool yourself is a cheaper option than hiring an outside service 
  2. Vacuuming your pool contributes to its longevity and health, meaning you will be able to enjoy your pool for longer
  3. Regular vacuuming can keep organic debris and dirt from negatively affecting your pool’s Ph balance
  4. It’s a great workout for your arms!

The Different Parts Of A Vacuum That You’ll Need

So now that you know how important it is to vacuum your pool, it’s time to understand the tool itself and what you will need in the first place. 

A vacuum head is the first component that you will notice: the head is what will suck up any dirt from the floor of your pool. It is attached to the telescopic pole of the vacuum.

The telescopic pole is what you will be holding onto while you clean. Modern-day vacuums have adjustable poles so that you can get to those hard to reach spots in your pool.

A vacuum hose is the ribbed tube of plastic, usually coloured blue, that connects your vacuum head to your pool’s pump. All dirt will travel through this tube, so it is important that you keep it untangled and make sure there are no leaks.

A skim vac or vacuum plate is the final component of your pool’s vacuum. This part sits on top of your pool’s strainer basket.

7.5m-Manhattan-Royal-Jade-Shimmer

How Do I Use My Vacuum?

Follow these easy steps to vacuum your pool efficiently:

  1. Don’t underestimate how strenuous vacuuming your pool can take. It is harder than skim cleaning your pool, so you should come prepared. Make sure to take regular breaks!  
  2. Using long strokes, start your vacuum at the shallow end of your pool and work towards the deep end. Make sure that if any sediment comes loose you come back to clean it again. Always overlap your vacuum strokes somewhat, to ensure you don’t miss any sediment.
  3. Always make sure to be patient and take your time as you vacuum. Unlike skim cleaning, you can’t rush vacuuming. This is because moving your vacuum head too fast may disturb any sediment that is resting on your pool floor and make your pool water cloudy.
  4. If the water does become too cloudy because of disturbed sediment, make sure to take an hour or two break to let it settle, before coming back and cleaning again.
  5. Finish your vacuum strokes at the deep end of your pool, adjusting your telescopic pole’s height if necessary.

Post-Clean Finish

The final step to vacuuming your pool requires you to clean your vacuum! Surprising, we know, but it’s essential. Unscrew the head of your vacuum and drain any excess water that might have collected there during your clean.

Once the vacuum is clean, replace the head with a brush. Use this brush to scrub down the surface of your pool, or any blemishes caused by organic debris (leaves) that you can spot. This sediment should be dissolved by your pool’s chlorine, but if you notice it settling onto the floor of your pool, then consider doing brushing before you vacuum.

As always, you will want to double-check that your filter is performing optimally. Vacuuming tends to put your filter under additional strain. Ensure that not blockages have formed as a result of your clean – this will be less likely if your vacuum clean is a regular affair.

Final Steps

Congratulations! You just successfully vacuumed your pool! Many pool owners can make the mistake of thinking they only need to skim clean their pool; but properly vacuuming is a crucial component in keeping your pool healthy for many years to come. A pool cover will help tremendously in keeping out most organic debris, making your cleaning process even easier; but first, you’ll need a pool! Here at Newcastle Swimming Pools, we have Australia’s favourite range of fibreglass pools. Contact us today for your free quote!

5 Proven Tips To Save You Time Cleaning Your Fibreglass Pool!

Here at Newcastle Pools, we understand that standing over your pool with a skimmer and wearing your back out trying to get that last darned leaf wasn’t exactly what you had in mind when you bought your pool. In fact, many pool owners simply can’t be bothered cleaning their pool regularly – who can blame them? But neglecting to clean your pool on a regular basis leads to all sorts of bigger problems down the road! (For both you and your wallet.) What if, and hear us out here, we told you there were a few secrets that meant you wouldn’t have to spend hours cleaning your fibreglass pool? Well if that piqued your interest, then read on!

5-tips-to-save-you-time-cleaning-your-fibreglass-pool-08

Secret Number 1: Deal With Stains The Best Way!

Stains can be a headache to remove. Pool owners can sometimes spend a lengthy amount of time removing them, simply because they don’t know what kind of stain they’re dealing with. Identify your pool’s stain, and cleaning it will become infinitely easier.

Stains on your fibreglass pool can be caused by a variety of different reasons. But, you wouldn’t clean a plate with the same rag you cleaned your car, would you? (We certainly hope not!) What we’re trying to say is, most stains can be removed quite easily, but different stains require different solutions:

Organic Pool Stains:

These kinds of stains are the most common to fibreglass pools. They can include:

  1. Dirt
  2. Berries
  3. Insects
  4. Leaves
  5. Debris left behind by your pets

Thankfully, being the most common stain for fibreglass pools means that organic stains are also the easiest to handle. Gently scrub the stain with a standard brush and the stain should dislodge itself. You shouldn’t need any advanced chemicals or tools for this job. However, a great way to prevent organic stains is to fish organic matter out of the pool when you see it, before it can become a stain.

Metal Stains:

Metal stains are much more common in older pools than anything modern, particularly fibreglass pools. However, they can still happen even under the best of care. Such metal stains can be:

  1. Copper
  2. Magnesium 
  3. Iron

To remove a metal stain simply rub a vitamin C tablet on the stain. If it doesn’t lighten, then you may have algae instead of a stain. 

Calcium Stains:

You may notice that calcium build-up isn’t technically a stain. Instead, calcium tends to spread across your pool similar to dirt, fading the fibreglass surface and making it look older. This happens when the calcium in your pool water bonds with the pool surface – because of unbalanced Ph levels. To ensure this doesn’t happen, regularly check your pool’s chemicals are balanced correctly, or give your pool a shock treatment if it’s already building up.

Even if your poolside area is relatively clean and free of trees, its still important to clean your pool regularly. Checking your chemical balance is especially important – calcium stains won’t show up until its too late!

Majestic-pacific-shimmer

Secret Number 2: Keep Debris Out Of Your Pool!

This is by far the most tedious cleaning process (in our opinion!) But it is also the area in which you can save the most time. Choosing to ignore skim cleaning your pool daily can be a big mistake: those leaves you left in your pool can build up over time, until when you finally do clean it, the process could take up to an hour. Additionally, the more leaves floating around in your pool, the more strain you’re putting on your filter. We recommend spending a mere 5-10 minutes daily to clean your pool with a skimmer, and this way you can avoid having to do a big clean on the weekend!

Secret Number 3: Always Keep An Eye On Your Filter!

Some pool owners can make the mistake of believing their pool filter is simply too technical or intimidating to check themselves. Nothing could be further from the truth. By checking your pool filter yourself, you’ll be able to tell clearly whether or not your current cleaning schedule is doing enough to offload pressure from the filter. Additionally, by keeping an eye on your filter, you’ll be able to tell exactly when you’re due for a refitting. Were this to come upon you unexpectedly, you’d likely be spending hours to fix it. Therefore, regularly checking your pool filter, even for a quick 10 minutes a week, can save you time in the long run – especially during Autumn when those leaves start to pile up!

…Keeping your pool cover on will mean your pool naturally retains heat for longer. It will also keep out any stray debris – saving you time on cleaning!…

Secret Number 4: If You Haven’t Already - Get A Pool Cover!

The real secret here is why doesn’t every pool owner have a cover! We’re just joking, but on a more serious note: utilising your pool cover is the most efficient and simplest way to save time on cleaning!

A pool cover primarily keeps out organic material and debris from falling into your pool. A typical pool cover will only take a minute or two before to roll on, and the benefits are amazing! Did you know that pool covers can also lower heating costs in your pool and lower the cost of cleaning? 

This is because with the cover on, your pool will naturally retain heat longer and faster. Next, with your pool cover on, outside debris will not be able to sink into your pool. Meaning, of course, you can use less chemicals to clean your pool and save the rest for peak periods of use. In fact, it’s actually recommended to lower your chemical dosage when your pool is not in use and the cover is on.

So, keep that pool cover on and you won’t have to be cleaning your pool every day like usual!

Secret Number 5: Don’t Skimp On Your Pool’s Maintenance!

A little bit of maintenance can go a long way towards saving you from a lot of headache later on. Just as you should be checking your filter regularly, we also recommend that you check on your PH and alkaline levels, too. Chemical imbalances are one of the most costly and time-sinking problems that can affect your pool. Further, a chemical imbalance is not always immediately recognisable: and it can negatively affect your pool’s equipment, causing severe degradation. Avoid this by ensuring your chemicals are balanced in your pool – and do so often!

Here at Newcastle Pools we understand that cleaning your pool is oftentimes the last thing you want to do with your pool. But we cannot stress enough how important it is to regularly clean it anyway: doing so can save you a significant amount of money and time down the track. If you need any more information, please don’t hesitate to get in contact and one of our friendly, professional team members from Newcastle Swimming Pools will be in touch shortly!

A Complete And Informative Guide To Swimming Pool Cleaners

Swimming pools are the prized possession of any homeowner. Come summer, you can have endless hours of splashing in the cool pool waters to beat the heat. Your pool becomes the centerpiece for all your fun family gatherings or hip pool parties with your friends. Unfortunately, all this comes at a cost. If you don’t maintain your pool regularly, you will have to say goodbye to the sparkling clear water.

We understand cleaning the pool isn’t as exciting as splashing in the pool water, but it becomes a necessity for a healthy pool. With a wide range of swimming pool cleaners available today, cleaning your pool has become a lot easier.

In this article, we give you a complete rundown of swimming pool cleaners that you can buy to prevent your pool from getting dirty.

But first, let us start with the basics.

The Essentials of Pool Cleaning

Here is what is involved in pool maintenance:

  • A filtration system is essential for a pool to remove the impurities and ensure the water stays circulated. The circulation prevents algae and bacteria growth.
  • Your pool water requires a sanitizing agent such as salt, chlorine or other such chemicals to maintain the pool water quality. If the pool water isn’t balanced, it can turn green quickly.
  • Lastly, your pool may collect a lot of debris in the form of leaves, twigs and other such contaminants. You must have the right pool cleaner to scoop the unwanted objects out of your pool.

Different Types of Swimming Pool Cleaners

Listed below are the 5 main types of pool cleaners that you can choose from:

Manual Pool Cleaners

Manual pool cleaners are your DIY cleaners. This is the cheapest option available amongst pool cleaners where you are required to put all the effort behind vacuuming, brushing and skimming. If you have a limited budget, a manual pool cleaner can fit the bill as it falls in the range of $100 and $400.

A manual pool cleaner kit consists of a pool leaf rake, hose, telescopic pole, vacuum, water testing kit and a pool broom. If you love spending time in your backyard, it can be a good choice for you. Remember to vacuum all the important areas of your pool at least once a week.

Note: If you live in a region where you have frequent sandstorms, manual pool cleaners can get very time-consuming and cumbersome to maintain your pool regularly. Also, if you have too many trees in your backyard it will involve cleaning a lot of fallen leaves and twigs from the pool constantly. A manual cleaner may not be ideal in these circumstances.

Suction Pool Cleaners

Suction pool cleaners are a step up from manual cleaners. They have a self-cleaning mechanism that takes care of the vacuuming of the pool so you save some labor and time on it. A suction pool cleaner cleans the debris in the pool by connecting to the skimmers and moving across the floor. The skimmer basket collects all the debris and must be cleaned at regular intervals for optimum pool maintenance.

As far as price is concerned, suction pool cleaners land somewhere between the range of $400 and $1200. Typically, the cleaning kit includes a pool hose, suction side cleaning device and a vacuum plate. A little drawback with suction pool cleaners is that you need to keep the pool pump running for them to work. This can increase your electricity bill and also take a toll on your pool’s filtration system in the long run.

Pressure Side Pool Cleaners

Do you live in a windy area where your pool collects a lot of debris right after you have given it a good cleaning session? Pressure side pool cleaners are what you need especially if the debris involves larger pieces of dirt. Widely popular as booster pump cleaners, pressure-side pool cleaners can somewhere cost between $300 and $1000. If you buy it from a reputable company, it usually comes with a warranty that covers you for unforeseen events.

There are two ways to use a pressure side pool cleaner – by directly connecting it to the circulation pump of the pool or by using a separate booster pump. No matter which method you choose, you can enjoy power-packed cleaning. Another plus of investing in pressure side pool cleaners is that they take the load off your filtration system. How? By collecting the debris in a separate bag instead of your skimmer basket, these super pool cleaners reduce the wear and tear of your filtration system in the long run.

Robotic Pool Cleaners

If you aren’t a person who would happily spend hours in their backyard to manually clean their pool, robotic pool cleaners can work wonders for you. Without a doubt, these are the most innovative and effective pool cleaners you could have asked for. Based on the model you select robotic pool cleaners can even clean the less used areas of the pool with utmost precision. From scrubbing the stairs of your pool to brushing the walls, they do a thorough job at keeping your pool shiny clean. So here are the top robotic pool cleaners in 2021!

There is a common rumor surrounding robotic pool cleaners suggesting that they result in exorbitant electricity bills. However, that’s far from the truth. They are the most energy-efficient of all the pool cleaners and use the same electricity as a regular bulb in your house. Where price is concerned, they usually fall in the bracket of $1500 and $5000 depending on the brand and model type. But they are worth every penny as they reduce your pool maintenance costs in the long run.

In-built Pool Cleaners

In-built pool cleaners offer the best form of luxury when it comes to pool maintenance. They are self-cleaning and use state-of-the-art technology to ensure your pool stays healthy and clean at all times. They are designed to handle large levels of debris and can assist in your pool’s circulation and heating as well. The best part is since they sit flush at the pool’s bottom you can enjoy an uninterrupted swim for hours without noticing the cleaner.

In-built pool cleaners can be costly starting from around $9000 depending on your pool size and brand of the cleaner. But for the features they offer, they are totally worth the value. You can connect them to your smart device and control the pool components at the touch of a button.

Note: In-built pool cleaners have to be installed during the construction of the pool and cannot be added later. Here is our fantastic guide on how to keep on top of your pool maintenance.

Bottom Line

We hope this comprehensive guide has made it easier for you to decide the pool cleaner you want. Remember, you must avoid bacteria and algae from settling in your pool water to maintain the hygiene levels of your swimming pool. By taking routine care, you can avoid your pool water from getting cloudy, discolored or murky. If you find the responsibility of pool maintenance overwhelming, we can help you choose the right cleaner.

If you have any more questions, you can get in touch with our friendly team. We have years of experience in installing pools for our happy customers and you could be next. 

Vacuuming Your Pool - An Informative Guide To Everything You Need To Know

Vacuuming your swimming pool is a job that must be done often to keep your equipment working as it should and your pool clean and safe to swim in. So, what’s involved exactly? Well, you need a few pieces of equipment and the rest we’ll explain throughout this post. Here’s everything you need to know about vacuuming your pool.

Equipment

Before you can vacuum your pool, you need the right equipment. This is what you should have:

  1. Telescopic pole – A telescopic pole is an essential pool accessory and can be used for many pool cleaning tasks.

  2. Vacuum head – A vacuum head attaches to your telescopic pole. It is a plastic contraption with rollers or a brush on the bottom. Vacuum head attachments are universal and can fit on almost all telescopic poles.

  3. Vacuum hose – You need a vacuum hose. One end will attach to your vacuum head, the other to your skimmer. Ensure your hose is long enough to reach the entire length of your pool.

  4. Skimmer plate – A skimmer plate attaches to the skimmer and your vacuum hose connects the skimmer plate.

Setting your vacuum up

Setting up your vacuum is simple, you can do it following these seven easy steps:

  1. Click your vacuum head onto your telescopic pole.

  2. Turn your pump off.

  3. Lift your skimmer lid, put your skimmer plate into the skimmer and fasten it into position.

  4. Attach your vacuum hose to the vacuum head, attach the other end of the hose onto the skimmer plate.

  5. Select your filter setting. On your pump, you will find a lever. Keep it on the filter setting if the pool only needs a light once over. If there is a substantial quantity of leaves and other debris, turn the lever to the waste setting, this will send the water directly down the drain instead of through the filter. You may need to top your pool water up with a hose when using the waste setting.

  6. Next, you can start vacuuming. Pool vacuuming is much like normal household vacuuming, although you just go a tad slower, so you don’t mix the dirt through the water when passing over it. Make sure you run the vacuum over all surface areas of the pool and repeat if necessary. If the pool is exceptionally dirty, you might have to remove the skimmer basket and empty it to ensure it doesn’t affect the suction. Make sure you turn the pump off before lifting your skimmer plate to remove the skimmer basket.

  7. Once you’ve finished vacuuming the pool, you can disassemble the hose from the vacuum head and the hose from the skimmer plate. Empty your skimmer and return your lever to its original setting.

  8. Test your water to ensure that it doesn’t need rebalancing. Adjust if necessary.

Ideally, you should do this weekly and more so if there has been wind, rain etc and there is more debris in your pool than normal. It is best to do this as soon as you can rather than leaving it, as the dirt and contaminants will throw your pools chemistry levels out and that can be a painstaking task trying to rectify it.

We know what you're thinking, there has to be an easier way, right?

Well, of course, there is! Manually vacuuming your pool is not the only way you can keep it looking fantastic. You could hire a professional pool cleaner to do it for you or you can invest in an automatic cleaner. They automate your pool vacuuming so you don’t have to. While they are more costly than your traditional manual vacuum, they can save you a tonne of time on pool cleaning, so are they worth it? Yes, if you want to keep your pool maintenance to the minimum. The good news is they aren’t as expensive as you may think with options starting as little as $200. Here is a basic rundown of the three main types of automatic pool cleaners:

Side suction cleaners

Starting at the cheapest end of the automatic pool cleaning scale is a side suction cleaner. They attach the same way as a manual vacuum via the skimmer plate using a vacuum hose and work virtually the same, except you don’t have to do anything. They navigate across the surface of the pool picking up debris and dirt as they go.

Pressure side cleaners

Pressure side cleaners are more expensive than suction-side cleaners, however, they offer a supreme clean that simply cannot be matched by a side suction cleaner. Unlike manual vacuums and side suction cleaners that get their power from the skimmer, pressure-side cleaners attach to the return jets of your pool instead to accelerate their way across the pool. The dirt and debris are collected in their own cleaning bag that is attached to the device.

Robotic Pool Cleaners

Robotic pool cleaners are the most advanced automatic pool cleaning device and whilst expensive, they are the most effective and energy-efficient. They have advanced brushing technology integrated into the device and can clean the entire pool with ease, including the steps. Robotic cleaners are different from the other cleaners as they use electricity to function and it is so minimal – only around the same as a light globe. They are a worthwhile investment for the long-term cost-saving benefits they offer.

In-Floor Cleaning Systems

The latest pools have the option of a built-in cleaning system, and they are the ultimate luxury when it comes to pool cleaners. They are built into the floor of your pool and offer the highest water quality and the most superior clean, all while requiring virtually no effort from you. Built-in cleaners circulate every inch of your pool water and propel water towards the drain taking debris and dirt with it, which is highly effective at preventing algae from growing. This type of cleaner can only be installed in the construction process and cant be added later, unfortunately, so if its something you’d consider, make sure you let your pool builder know when in the design phase.

Do I still need to manually vacuum my pool if have an automatic cleaner?

Automatic cleaners do a great job of the day to day pool cleaning, however, there will be times when you should manually vacuum your pool as the cleaner alone won’t be enough. Heavy storms, wind or excessive leaf fall are some of the few occasions when it pays to manually give your pool a vacuum along with running your cleaner. This will ensure that external contaminants haven’t had a chance to break down and cause imbalances in your water. If this happens, it can turn your water cloudy or green quite quickly. This can be time-consuming and costly to fix, so it’s not worth letting it get to this stage.

We hope after reading this post you have an idea of what pool vacuuming is and how it works. If you have any questions about vacuuming your swimming pool, feel free to get in contact with our fibreglass pool professionals here at Newcastle Swimming Pools, we’d love to help if we can.

An Informative Guide To Skimmers For Your Pool!

Your pool’s equipment is made up of many components that work cohesively together to keep your pool looking crystal clear and safe to swim in. Learning about all of them may seem overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. You may or may not know what skimmers are if you don’t, this is for you. Here’s everything you need to know.

What are pool skimmers?

A pool skimmer is a key part of your pool circulation system. Without it, your pool would turn green very quickly. You will recognise them as the rectangle opening at one end of your pool, these are called built-in skimmers and almost every inground pool will have one, sometimes more depending on the capacity of the pool. Inside the skimmer, you will see a removable basket. This is used to collect leaves and other debris from the pool. You can simply remove the basket to empty the contents. Other types of pool skimmers include floating skimmers, automatic skimmers and robotic skimmers.

So, how do they work?

The skimmer is the first part of your pool’s filtration and circulation system. A suction pipe is located underneath the skimmer basket and it draws the surface water of your pool into the skimmer. The water is sucked through the skimmer basket and this picks up contaminants before sending the water to the filter. The filter picks up finer particles of dirt left behind by the skimmer. The filtered water is then returned to your pool via your return jets. This limits the amount of debris that can sink to the bottom of the pool and disrupt your chemical levels, giving you cleaner water.

Your pool skimmer is made of the following components:

Skimmer Lid

Built-in skimmers have a lid to cover the hole where the skimmer is. This prevents people from accidentally stepping in it and injuring themselves and stops additional leaves and debris from falling into the skimmer. The skimmer lid is usually round and made of plastic. You will find it on the outside of your pool above where the skimmer is.

Skimmer Door (Weir)

The skimmer door which is known as a weir is a flap that covers the skimmer mouth. It swings with the motion of the water and its main objective is to stop leaf litter and other contaminants from floating out of the skimmer and back into the pool. The weir remains closed when the pump is switched off to keep the debris in the skimmer.

Skimmer Mouth

The skimmer mouth is the rectangle-shaped hole in the side of your pool wall. Water is drawn in the mouth bringing with it leaf litter and other contaminants. They will then get trapped in the skimmer basket.

Skimmer Basket

Your skimmer basket is scattered with many small holes that essentially strain leaves, sticks and other unwanted nasties from your pool water before it gets sucked into your pump. Your skimmer basket should be intact and have no broken bits or cracks otherwise, the debris can escape and choke up the filtration system or worse cause costly damage. 

Skimmers Suction Line

Water is sucked into the skimmer via the suction line. Its what draws the water past the weir, into the mouth, through the basket and to the filter pump. Your suction line mustn’t be clogged at any point to ensure it doesn’t interfere with your equipment or compromise the efficiency of your circulation system.

Skimmer Equalizer Line

The skimmer equalizer line prevents damage to the pump if the water has dropped below its normal level which should be around halfway up the skimmer mouth. It stops the pump from sucking in air.

Skimmer Extras

Skimmer Plate

A skimmer plate is an accessory that you will need if you have an automatic or manual pool cleaner. It attaches above your skimmer basket and the dirt and debris picked up from the cleaner are disposed of in the skimmer basket.

Skimmer Sock

Skimmer socks are designed to filter your water further. They work by picking up small pieces of dirt and debris that normally get through the skimmer basket holes. This gives you higher-quality water and improves your pool’s filtration. They are made of fine mesh nylon that is stretchy and durable. Skimmer socks are placed over your skimmer basket and are designed to withstand exposure to chemicals without wear. They are reusable and easy to clean, they’re simply rinsed with water and replaced into position.

Tips to help you maintain your skimmer

Pool care goes hand in hand with pool ownership and maintenance of your skimmer is no exception. Looking after your skimmer will see it work to its full potential and can help to avoid unnecessary damage due to poor upkeep. Not only that, if your skimmer isn’t cleared out and looked after properly it will force the pump to work harder to do its job, meaning it will chew more electricity.

Here's How To Clean Your Skimmer:

Before you do anything, you need to switch the pump off. You can then lift the skimmer lid, if you have a skimmer plate in place, you will have to remove it. Lift your skimmer basket out and empty the debris inside, rinse with a garden hose to remove smaller particles that may be stuck on the sides and difficult to shift. Make sure you don’t do this over your pool water. Put your skimmer basket back into position and then your lid. You can now turn your pump back on. To keep your pool and equipment in tip-top shape, we recommended doing this at least once a week and more if you have dense foliage around your pool that sheds excessive leaf litter or if there have been strong winds.

Adding Chlorine To Your Skimmer

Adding chlorine tablets to you skimmer is an effective way to sanitise your pool and saves you from having to buy a floating chlorine dispenser. The benefit of adding chlorine to your skimmer rather than directly in the pool or in a dispenser is that the suction of the water from the skimmer dissolves the tablets faster. This produces cleaner water that is free from impurities. If you have a skimmer sock over your skimmer basket, make sure you take it off if you put chlorine tablets in as it can prematurely wear the material. Ensure you remove any remaining chlorine tablet fragments that are left in your basket when the pump is turned off. Leaving highly concentrated chlorine in your skimmer can damage your equipment over time.

Without a skimmer in your pool, it would be difficult to stop your water from going green and it would place a significant strain on your pump which would likely lead to malfunctions at some point. We hope this post has given you an understanding of what skimmers are all about and how they work. If you have any questions, feel free to get in contact with our friendly team here at Newcastle Swimming Pools. We specialise in award-winning fibreglass pools and can tell you everything you need to know about skimmers and swimming pools in general.

How Do You Clean A Fibreglass Pool?

In the excitement of purchasing a pool, cleaning is a factor that is often overlooked. Pool maintenance goes hand in hand with pool ownership, but it doesn’t have to be a monotonous chore that chews up your free time. We have put together this simple guide to help you clean your fibreglass pool.

how-do-you-clean-a-fibreglass-pool-landscape

Skim The Water Of Leaf Litter And Debris

Regardless of whether you have trees or plants near your pool, it’s a given that leaf litter, dirt and insects will find its way to your pool water. These should be removed before they have a chance to sink to the bottom because once they do, they start decomposing and will throw out your pools pH level. The most effective way to do this is by purchasing a telescopic pole with a scoop net attachment. They are easy to use and inexpensive. If you have a lot of plants around your pool area, you may find you have to do this almost daily. To reduce the density of foliage falling into your pool, regularly trim trees and shrubs. While your skimmer will eliminate a portion of contaminants by drawing the surface water into it to filter, there will still be residual debris that it hasn’t picked up. Ensure you empty your skimmer basket when you are clearing the pool of leaves and dirt. You can do this by simply removing the basket, tapping the contents in the bin, rinsing with a hose to free small particles and replacing into position.

Balance The Pools Chemistry Levels

Up there with one of the most important components of pool care is balancing the water levels. The easiest way to do this is with a water testing kit. They are user friendly and you can usually get them for less than $50. Each kit contains testing strips and a colour graph, some come with small containers too. To test your water levels, it’s just a matter of collecting a sample of pool water, dipping a testing strip into it, removing, and comparing it to the graph provided on the bottle or in the pack. This will give you an instant indication of whether your levels are off or not. Ensure you have the necessary chemicals at home to treat your pool so if your levels are unbalanced you can see it quickly to prevent it affecting your water quality.

Clean Out Your Filter

While your skimmer basket will collect leaves and large debris from the water, the filter picks up finer particles of dirt from the water that would otherwise disrupt your chemical levels. They play a key role in keeping your water crystal clear and the cleaning technique will vary depending on which type of filter you have. There are three types of filters used in a pool filtration system. They include cartridge filters, sand filters and diatomaceous earth (DE Filters). To ensure you are protecting your equipment and cleaning it properly, you must follow the cleaning instructions as per your manual. If this is something you don’t feel comfortable tackling yourself, you can hire a professional pool cleaner to run you through the process or take over the pool maintenance for you altogether.

Vacuum The Pool

You have two choices when it comes to vacuuming your pool. You can do it manually by attaching a vacuum head to a telescopic pole and running it over every section of your pool to suck up dirt and debris or you can invest in an automatic pool cleaner which essentially does the job for you. While automatic cleaners are more of an outlay initially, the time saved on manually vacuuming the pool every week makes them a worthwhile investment.

venetian-pool

Only Use Products Designed For Fibreglass Pool Use

Using the wrong chemicals to clean your pool can damage the interior surface and wear away at your equipment. For many, pools are a big home investment so, while there may be cheaper alternatives that claim to do the job, it is better to stick with products that are safe for fibreglass pools. This also ensures your swimmers are safe too.

Sanitiser

When residential swimming pools first came about, traditional chlorine was the only sanitising option available, today there are other choices such as salt and mineral, both are extremely popular. Many are surprised to discover that all types use chlorine to clean the water, they just use a lower dose. Your sanitiser works to eradicate algae and bacteria, it must be maintained at the correct level as too much can cause skin irritation and not enough won’t clean the water properly. The correct level of chlorine in a mineral pool should be around 0.05ppm, chlorine and salt pools need to be between 1-3 ppm.

Monitor The Surface For Stains

It’s a good idea to keep an eye out for stains and treat them as soon as you notice them. If they are left untreated for an extended period, they can be troublesome to remove, not only that they look unsightly too and can make your pool look dirty. Before attempting to remove the stain, you need to know what has caused it in the first place. The colour can give you an indication as to what type of material is the culprit. Here are some common examples:

• Grey stains – Magnesium

• Maroon stains – Iron

• Greenish/brown stains – Organic matter

• Turquoise – Copper

You can avoid stains by including a metal chelating agent into your monthly routine. If you already have light stains starting to form, use a soft sponge and detergent to shift it. If they are heavy stains, you will need to use a stain remover.

organic-pool-stain

Top Your Pool Up

On occasion, you may notice your pool water level has dropped and more so in summer. Evaporation attributes to most of your pools water loss. The water should be halfway up to the skimmer box to ensure your pool’s equipment is doing its job properly. If it’s too full the skimmer is unable to draw water in to filter it and in this case, you will need to drain some water out. If it is too low, the skimmer will suck in air which can permanently damage your pool pump.

Purchase A Pool Cover

Pool covers are an effective way to reduce your pool maintenance. They prevent leaves and dirt from falling into your pool and they reduce chemical, heat, and water loss by 95%. This will save you a significant amount of time and money.

Set Up A Maintenance Schedule

One of the many great things about fibreglass pools is they are relatively easy to look after and you don’t have to dedicate a lot of time to pool maintenance. Set up a weekly schedule to complete the tasks mentioned above. This will ensure your pool equipment is kept in optimal working order and your water quality will be maintained at a safe and sanitary level, ready for you to swim in year-round. If you have any questions about cleaning your fibreglass pools or would like to speak to one of our team members here at Newcastle Swimming Pools, get in touch, we will happily assist if we can.